#Honkeytonk in #Nashville #musiccity #roadtrip #USAisAOk (at Robert’s Western World)

#RoyalStreet #NewOrleans #NOLA #dirtysouth #roadtrip #USAisAok

Our two weeks in Florida consisted of snorkeling over the abundant coral reefs right off Clearwater Beach, wrestling alligators in the Hillsborough river and riding wild boar through the pan handle. Okay…okay…just kidding. Reality is that none of this happened. But, you know what did? A lot of eat-drink-and-be-merry with family and friends, many bubble baths, yoga out the yin yang and the best weather the sunshine state has to offer (cool mornings with sun and 70s during the day).
Our first stop was Adrian’s parent’s beautiful home in Lithia, FL. We squeezed the fam, including Mama (Ade’s grandma) and Aunt Melinda and we were all off to the Latin Cafe for mofongo! I dream about this stuff. Mofongo is a Puerto Rican dish made of smashed plantains, garlic, onions and crispy pieces of pork. The Latin Cafe’s version sits in a vinegar-based broth, which sends my tastebuds through the roof! We also got to make pastelillos (empanadas) and Puerto Rican spaghetti with Mama. Mmmm. All this eating was followed with morning yoga in the sunny lanai, a beautiful setting to practice.
After a few nights in Lithia, Adrian was off to Poza Rica, Mexico for the Cumbre Tajin music festival where Primus opened for Tool and I went to Clearwater to stay with my best friend Bri and visit with her fam. I taught yoga by the pool to Bri and her 4-year old son, Kai and attended a class at a local studio. We played in the park, ran errands and prepared delicious meals. After five months of eating out for every meal, it’s a real treat to prepare and eat fresh, healthy meals. I also got to see little Kai play in his soccer game and witnessed his first goal! Goal or no goal, Aunt Jenny was proud and beaming with joy.
While all this was going on, Adrian had a full day of travel, one day of work at the festival and a full day of travel back with a trip to the Tajin pyramids squeezed in. An exhausted Adrian met me at Bri’s and rolled into bed. Before we knew it, we were up and at ‘em for an early morning paddle practice with Bri and her hubby, Jean. They run the Kai Aniani canoe club with about 30 members that practice multiple times a week and compete in outrigger canoe competitions around the country. Basically, they are bad a$$es. Then a trip to Frenchie’s for she-crab soup and a grouper sandwich followed by a tasty crableg dinner prepared by Bri’s mom (my second mom), Bridget. We were in a food coma fit for kings.
An hour drive to Bradenton and we were standing face to face with the man, the myth, the legend, Val Sawhill and his lovely, ever-so-patient wife, Deb. Val and Deb are my longtime friend Nikki’s parents whom used to live in Akron, Ohio, but now go back and forth from Ohio to Florida. More accurately, I think the term to describe this behavior is snow birdism. Val, a seasoned SE Asian adventurer, was a huge help to us as we prepared for our trip. Many emails were sent and filled with much-needed advice and he even created a little treasure hunt for us in Bangkok. Val and Deb took Adrian and I to their favorite Thai restaurant and to be honest I was a bit nervous after growing accustomed to eating the real deal in Thailand, but this place did not disappoint. The penang curry with duck was insane! The best duck we’ve ever had. No joke. Publix’ keylime pie and Deb’s homemade clementine cake awaited back home. Have I mentioned how much I love to eat and talk about food?! We loved the discussions, laughs and company, but after a night’s stay, us gypsies were on the move.
An hour drive and we arrived to Ingo and Lindsey (Loo Hoo’s) home in Tampa. We were greeted by the new parents and their 7-month old baby boy, Falko. Finally, we got to meet the little butter ball! Ingo asked if we wanted his homemade spaetzle with creamy, herbalicious mushroom sauce for dinner. Like he really needed to ask! I think we all know what the answer was. The next morning, yoga on the back deck with the chickens in a brisk 47 degrees. It eventually warmed up and more yoga with our friend, Bernie who came over for a yoga session during his lunch break. Bernie is Malay and insanely flexible, which adds evidence to my theory that all Asians are naturally flexible. If you’ve ever seen how Asians sit AKA squat then you know what I mean.
That evening we went to my fave Tampa bar, Fly (Adrian and I’s first date spot), for a bite, couple of drinks and to meet up with some old friends. We got to visit with Bonnie, her hubby Gary and their super cute 1-year old son. Natalie and Melissa (Melisun), my ye olde copy shoppe bias (former coworkers) met us out and we talked and laughed for hours. Twas a magical evening.
The next day we were back to Lithia to spend the weekend with Adrian’s fam and of course, copious amounts of food were indulged. Something happened in the Sanchez household about a year ago. Adrian’s dad, Jose, started cooking. And, I like it. Jose said he’s become a Renaissance man. Well, he must have picked up some tips from Mama after all these years, because his bacalao (salted cod with plantains, avocados, tomatoes, onions and potatoes all drenched in EVOO), sautéed skirt steak with onions and vinegar, and octopus salad delighted every single one of my tastebuds. When we weren’t stuffing our faces, we were taking salsa lessons and peaceful walks along the nearby forest preserve with Adrian’s parents, watching movies with the fam and I taught a Sunday morning yoga class in the living room. Sanchez fam = future yogis! We even managed to get healthcare through the marketplace prior to the March 31 deadline and I filed my taxes. Starting to feel more like an American human.
A 7-hour drive and we were in the pan handle of the state, Pensacola. It’s here where Adrian’s friend, Kevin owns a machine shop, Electrical Guitar Company, where he builds custom aluminum guitars for big-name musicians. This guy is doing the damn thing. A few hours in the shop, din with Kevin and his wife, Hillary at the famous Maguires Irish Pub and a night’s stay at our first western hotel (a crummy Day’s Inn that somewhat feels like a 5-star hotel) since we’ve been back in the states and now we’re on the road again.
Big thanks to Aleida, Jose, Mama, Melinda, Bri, Jean, Kai, Bridget, Mark, Val, Deb, Loo Hoo, Ingo, Bernie, Bonnie, Gary, Dean, Melisun, Natalie, Kevin and Hillary for making these past two weeks simply amazing. We are blessed to have such amazing family and friends to surround ourselves with.
Next stop: New Orleans! Our two weeks in Florida consisted of snorkeling over the abundant coral reefs right off Clearwater Beach, wrestling alligators in the Hillsborough river and riding wild boar through the pan handle. Okay…okay…just kidding. Reality is that none of this happened. But, you know what did? A lot of eat-drink-and-be-merry with family and friends, many bubble baths, yoga out the yin yang and the best weather the sunshine state has to offer (cool mornings with sun and 70s during the day).
Our first stop was Adrian’s parent’s beautiful home in Lithia, FL. We squeezed the fam, including Mama (Ade’s grandma) and Aunt Melinda and we were all off to the Latin Cafe for mofongo! I dream about this stuff. Mofongo is a Puerto Rican dish made of smashed plantains, garlic, onions and crispy pieces of pork. The Latin Cafe’s version sits in a vinegar-based broth, which sends my tastebuds through the roof! We also got to make pastelillos (empanadas) and Puerto Rican spaghetti with Mama. Mmmm. All this eating was followed with morning yoga in the sunny lanai, a beautiful setting to practice.
After a few nights in Lithia, Adrian was off to Poza Rica, Mexico for the Cumbre Tajin music festival where Primus opened for Tool and I went to Clearwater to stay with my best friend Bri and visit with her fam. I taught yoga by the pool to Bri and her 4-year old son, Kai and attended a class at a local studio. We played in the park, ran errands and prepared delicious meals. After five months of eating out for every meal, it’s a real treat to prepare and eat fresh, healthy meals. I also got to see little Kai play in his soccer game and witnessed his first goal! Goal or no goal, Aunt Jenny was proud and beaming with joy.
While all this was going on, Adrian had a full day of travel, one day of work at the festival and a full day of travel back with a trip to the Tajin pyramids squeezed in. An exhausted Adrian met me at Bri’s and rolled into bed. Before we knew it, we were up and at ‘em for an early morning paddle practice with Bri and her hubby, Jean. They run the Kai Aniani canoe club with about 30 members that practice multiple times a week and compete in outrigger canoe competitions around the country. Basically, they are bad a$$es. Then a trip to Frenchie’s for she-crab soup and a grouper sandwich followed by a tasty crableg dinner prepared by Bri’s mom (my second mom), Bridget. We were in a food coma fit for kings.
An hour drive to Bradenton and we were standing face to face with the man, the myth, the legend, Val Sawhill and his lovely, ever-so-patient wife, Deb. Val and Deb are my longtime friend Nikki’s parents whom used to live in Akron, Ohio, but now go back and forth from Ohio to Florida. More accurately, I think the term to describe this behavior is snow birdism. Val, a seasoned SE Asian adventurer, was a huge help to us as we prepared for our trip. Many emails were sent and filled with much-needed advice and he even created a little treasure hunt for us in Bangkok. Val and Deb took Adrian and I to their favorite Thai restaurant and to be honest I was a bit nervous after growing accustomed to eating the real deal in Thailand, but this place did not disappoint. The penang curry with duck was insane! The best duck we’ve ever had. No joke. Publix’ keylime pie and Deb’s homemade clementine cake awaited back home. Have I mentioned how much I love to eat and talk about food?! We loved the discussions, laughs and company, but after a night’s stay, us gypsies were on the move.
An hour drive and we arrived to Ingo and Lindsey (Loo Hoo’s) home in Tampa. We were greeted by the new parents and their 7-month old baby boy, Falko. Finally, we got to meet the little butter ball! Ingo asked if we wanted his homemade spaetzle with creamy, herbalicious mushroom sauce for dinner. Like he really needed to ask! I think we all know what the answer was. The next morning, yoga on the back deck with the chickens in a brisk 47 degrees. It eventually warmed up and more yoga with our friend, Bernie who came over for a yoga session during his lunch break. Bernie is Malay and insanely flexible, which adds evidence to my theory that all Asians are naturally flexible. If you’ve ever seen how Asians sit AKA squat then you know what I mean.
That evening we went to my fave Tampa bar, Fly (Adrian and I’s first date spot), for a bite, couple of drinks and to meet up with some old friends. We got to visit with Bonnie, her hubby Gary and their super cute 1-year old son. Natalie and Melissa (Melisun), my ye olde copy shoppe bias (former coworkers) met us out and we talked and laughed for hours. Twas a magical evening.
The next day we were back to Lithia to spend the weekend with Adrian’s fam and of course, copious amounts of food were indulged. Something happened in the Sanchez household about a year ago. Adrian’s dad, Jose, started cooking. And, I like it. Jose said he’s become a Renaissance man. Well, he must have picked up some tips from Mama after all these years, because his bacalao (salted cod with plantains, avocados, tomatoes, onions and potatoes all drenched in EVOO), sautéed skirt steak with onions and vinegar, and octopus salad delighted every single one of my tastebuds. When we weren’t stuffing our faces, we were taking salsa lessons and peaceful walks along the nearby forest preserve with Adrian’s parents, watching movies with the fam and I taught a Sunday morning yoga class in the living room. Sanchez fam = future yogis! We even managed to get healthcare through the marketplace prior to the March 31 deadline and I filed my taxes. Starting to feel more like an American human.
A 7-hour drive and we were in the pan handle of the state, Pensacola. It’s here where Adrian’s friend, Kevin owns a machine shop, Electrical Guitar Company, where he builds custom aluminum guitars for big-name musicians. This guy is doing the damn thing. A few hours in the shop, din with Kevin and his wife, Hillary at the famous Maguires Irish Pub and a night’s stay at our first western hotel (a crummy Day’s Inn that somewhat feels like a 5-star hotel) since we’ve been back in the states and now we’re on the road again.
Big thanks to Aleida, Jose, Mama, Melinda, Bri, Jean, Kai, Bridget, Mark, Val, Deb, Loo Hoo, Ingo, Bernie, Bonnie, Gary, Dean, Melisun, Natalie, Kevin and Hillary for making these past two weeks simply amazing. We are blessed to have such amazing family and friends to surround ourselves with.
Next stop: New Orleans! Our two weeks in Florida consisted of snorkeling over the abundant coral reefs right off Clearwater Beach, wrestling alligators in the Hillsborough river and riding wild boar through the pan handle. Okay…okay…just kidding. Reality is that none of this happened. But, you know what did? A lot of eat-drink-and-be-merry with family and friends, many bubble baths, yoga out the yin yang and the best weather the sunshine state has to offer (cool mornings with sun and 70s during the day).
Our first stop was Adrian’s parent’s beautiful home in Lithia, FL. We squeezed the fam, including Mama (Ade’s grandma) and Aunt Melinda and we were all off to the Latin Cafe for mofongo! I dream about this stuff. Mofongo is a Puerto Rican dish made of smashed plantains, garlic, onions and crispy pieces of pork. The Latin Cafe’s version sits in a vinegar-based broth, which sends my tastebuds through the roof! We also got to make pastelillos (empanadas) and Puerto Rican spaghetti with Mama. Mmmm. All this eating was followed with morning yoga in the sunny lanai, a beautiful setting to practice.
After a few nights in Lithia, Adrian was off to Poza Rica, Mexico for the Cumbre Tajin music festival where Primus opened for Tool and I went to Clearwater to stay with my best friend Bri and visit with her fam. I taught yoga by the pool to Bri and her 4-year old son, Kai and attended a class at a local studio. We played in the park, ran errands and prepared delicious meals. After five months of eating out for every meal, it’s a real treat to prepare and eat fresh, healthy meals. I also got to see little Kai play in his soccer game and witnessed his first goal! Goal or no goal, Aunt Jenny was proud and beaming with joy.
While all this was going on, Adrian had a full day of travel, one day of work at the festival and a full day of travel back with a trip to the Tajin pyramids squeezed in. An exhausted Adrian met me at Bri’s and rolled into bed. Before we knew it, we were up and at ‘em for an early morning paddle practice with Bri and her hubby, Jean. They run the Kai Aniani canoe club with about 30 members that practice multiple times a week and compete in outrigger canoe competitions around the country. Basically, they are bad a$$es. Then a trip to Frenchie’s for she-crab soup and a grouper sandwich followed by a tasty crableg dinner prepared by Bri’s mom (my second mom), Bridget. We were in a food coma fit for kings.
An hour drive to Bradenton and we were standing face to face with the man, the myth, the legend, Val Sawhill and his lovely, ever-so-patient wife, Deb. Val and Deb are my longtime friend Nikki’s parents whom used to live in Akron, Ohio, but now go back and forth from Ohio to Florida. More accurately, I think the term to describe this behavior is snow birdism. Val, a seasoned SE Asian adventurer, was a huge help to us as we prepared for our trip. Many emails were sent and filled with much-needed advice and he even created a little treasure hunt for us in Bangkok. Val and Deb took Adrian and I to their favorite Thai restaurant and to be honest I was a bit nervous after growing accustomed to eating the real deal in Thailand, but this place did not disappoint. The penang curry with duck was insane! The best duck we’ve ever had. No joke. Publix’ keylime pie and Deb’s homemade clementine cake awaited back home. Have I mentioned how much I love to eat and talk about food?! We loved the discussions, laughs and company, but after a night’s stay, us gypsies were on the move.
An hour drive and we arrived to Ingo and Lindsey (Loo Hoo’s) home in Tampa. We were greeted by the new parents and their 7-month old baby boy, Falko. Finally, we got to meet the little butter ball! Ingo asked if we wanted his homemade spaetzle with creamy, herbalicious mushroom sauce for dinner. Like he really needed to ask! I think we all know what the answer was. The next morning, yoga on the back deck with the chickens in a brisk 47 degrees. It eventually warmed up and more yoga with our friend, Bernie who came over for a yoga session during his lunch break. Bernie is Malay and insanely flexible, which adds evidence to my theory that all Asians are naturally flexible. If you’ve ever seen how Asians sit AKA squat then you know what I mean.
That evening we went to my fave Tampa bar, Fly (Adrian and I’s first date spot), for a bite, couple of drinks and to meet up with some old friends. We got to visit with Bonnie, her hubby Gary and their super cute 1-year old son. Natalie and Melissa (Melisun), my ye olde copy shoppe bias (former coworkers) met us out and we talked and laughed for hours. Twas a magical evening.
The next day we were back to Lithia to spend the weekend with Adrian’s fam and of course, copious amounts of food were indulged. Something happened in the Sanchez household about a year ago. Adrian’s dad, Jose, started cooking. And, I like it. Jose said he’s become a Renaissance man. Well, he must have picked up some tips from Mama after all these years, because his bacalao (salted cod with plantains, avocados, tomatoes, onions and potatoes all drenched in EVOO), sautéed skirt steak with onions and vinegar, and octopus salad delighted every single one of my tastebuds. When we weren’t stuffing our faces, we were taking salsa lessons and peaceful walks along the nearby forest preserve with Adrian’s parents, watching movies with the fam and I taught a Sunday morning yoga class in the living room. Sanchez fam = future yogis! We even managed to get healthcare through the marketplace prior to the March 31 deadline and I filed my taxes. Starting to feel more like an American human.
A 7-hour drive and we were in the pan handle of the state, Pensacola. It’s here where Adrian’s friend, Kevin owns a machine shop, Electrical Guitar Company, where he builds custom aluminum guitars for big-name musicians. This guy is doing the damn thing. A few hours in the shop, din with Kevin and his wife, Hillary at the famous Maguires Irish Pub and a night’s stay at our first western hotel (a crummy Day’s Inn that somewhat feels like a 5-star hotel) since we’ve been back in the states and now we’re on the road again.
Big thanks to Aleida, Jose, Mama, Melinda, Bri, Jean, Kai, Bridget, Mark, Val, Deb, Loo Hoo, Ingo, Bernie, Bonnie, Gary, Dean, Melisun, Natalie, Kevin and Hillary for making these past two weeks simply amazing. We are blessed to have such amazing family and friends to surround ourselves with.
Next stop: New Orleans! Our two weeks in Florida consisted of snorkeling over the abundant coral reefs right off Clearwater Beach, wrestling alligators in the Hillsborough river and riding wild boar through the pan handle. Okay…okay…just kidding. Reality is that none of this happened. But, you know what did? A lot of eat-drink-and-be-merry with family and friends, many bubble baths, yoga out the yin yang and the best weather the sunshine state has to offer (cool mornings with sun and 70s during the day).
Our first stop was Adrian’s parent’s beautiful home in Lithia, FL. We squeezed the fam, including Mama (Ade’s grandma) and Aunt Melinda and we were all off to the Latin Cafe for mofongo! I dream about this stuff. Mofongo is a Puerto Rican dish made of smashed plantains, garlic, onions and crispy pieces of pork. The Latin Cafe’s version sits in a vinegar-based broth, which sends my tastebuds through the roof! We also got to make pastelillos (empanadas) and Puerto Rican spaghetti with Mama. Mmmm. All this eating was followed with morning yoga in the sunny lanai, a beautiful setting to practice.
After a few nights in Lithia, Adrian was off to Poza Rica, Mexico for the Cumbre Tajin music festival where Primus opened for Tool and I went to Clearwater to stay with my best friend Bri and visit with her fam. I taught yoga by the pool to Bri and her 4-year old son, Kai and attended a class at a local studio. We played in the park, ran errands and prepared delicious meals. After five months of eating out for every meal, it’s a real treat to prepare and eat fresh, healthy meals. I also got to see little Kai play in his soccer game and witnessed his first goal! Goal or no goal, Aunt Jenny was proud and beaming with joy.
While all this was going on, Adrian had a full day of travel, one day of work at the festival and a full day of travel back with a trip to the Tajin pyramids squeezed in. An exhausted Adrian met me at Bri’s and rolled into bed. Before we knew it, we were up and at ‘em for an early morning paddle practice with Bri and her hubby, Jean. They run the Kai Aniani canoe club with about 30 members that practice multiple times a week and compete in outrigger canoe competitions around the country. Basically, they are bad a$$es. Then a trip to Frenchie’s for she-crab soup and a grouper sandwich followed by a tasty crableg dinner prepared by Bri’s mom (my second mom), Bridget. We were in a food coma fit for kings.
An hour drive to Bradenton and we were standing face to face with the man, the myth, the legend, Val Sawhill and his lovely, ever-so-patient wife, Deb. Val and Deb are my longtime friend Nikki’s parents whom used to live in Akron, Ohio, but now go back and forth from Ohio to Florida. More accurately, I think the term to describe this behavior is snow birdism. Val, a seasoned SE Asian adventurer, was a huge help to us as we prepared for our trip. Many emails were sent and filled with much-needed advice and he even created a little treasure hunt for us in Bangkok. Val and Deb took Adrian and I to their favorite Thai restaurant and to be honest I was a bit nervous after growing accustomed to eating the real deal in Thailand, but this place did not disappoint. The penang curry with duck was insane! The best duck we’ve ever had. No joke. Publix’ keylime pie and Deb’s homemade clementine cake awaited back home. Have I mentioned how much I love to eat and talk about food?! We loved the discussions, laughs and company, but after a night’s stay, us gypsies were on the move.
An hour drive and we arrived to Ingo and Lindsey (Loo Hoo’s) home in Tampa. We were greeted by the new parents and their 7-month old baby boy, Falko. Finally, we got to meet the little butter ball! Ingo asked if we wanted his homemade spaetzle with creamy, herbalicious mushroom sauce for dinner. Like he really needed to ask! I think we all know what the answer was. The next morning, yoga on the back deck with the chickens in a brisk 47 degrees. It eventually warmed up and more yoga with our friend, Bernie who came over for a yoga session during his lunch break. Bernie is Malay and insanely flexible, which adds evidence to my theory that all Asians are naturally flexible. If you’ve ever seen how Asians sit AKA squat then you know what I mean.
That evening we went to my fave Tampa bar, Fly (Adrian and I’s first date spot), for a bite, couple of drinks and to meet up with some old friends. We got to visit with Bonnie, her hubby Gary and their super cute 1-year old son. Natalie and Melissa (Melisun), my ye olde copy shoppe bias (former coworkers) met us out and we talked and laughed for hours. Twas a magical evening.
The next day we were back to Lithia to spend the weekend with Adrian’s fam and of course, copious amounts of food were indulged. Something happened in the Sanchez household about a year ago. Adrian’s dad, Jose, started cooking. And, I like it. Jose said he’s become a Renaissance man. Well, he must have picked up some tips from Mama after all these years, because his bacalao (salted cod with plantains, avocados, tomatoes, onions and potatoes all drenched in EVOO), sautéed skirt steak with onions and vinegar, and octopus salad delighted every single one of my tastebuds. When we weren’t stuffing our faces, we were taking salsa lessons and peaceful walks along the nearby forest preserve with Adrian’s parents, watching movies with the fam and I taught a Sunday morning yoga class in the living room. Sanchez fam = future yogis! We even managed to get healthcare through the marketplace prior to the March 31 deadline and I filed my taxes. Starting to feel more like an American human.
A 7-hour drive and we were in the pan handle of the state, Pensacola. It’s here where Adrian’s friend, Kevin owns a machine shop, Electrical Guitar Company, where he builds custom aluminum guitars for big-name musicians. This guy is doing the damn thing. A few hours in the shop, din with Kevin and his wife, Hillary at the famous Maguires Irish Pub and a night’s stay at our first western hotel (a crummy Day’s Inn that somewhat feels like a 5-star hotel) since we’ve been back in the states and now we’re on the road again.
Big thanks to Aleida, Jose, Mama, Melinda, Bri, Jean, Kai, Bridget, Mark, Val, Deb, Loo Hoo, Ingo, Bernie, Bonnie, Gary, Dean, Melisun, Natalie, Kevin and Hillary for making these past two weeks simply amazing. We are blessed to have such amazing family and friends to surround ourselves with.
Next stop: New Orleans! Our two weeks in Florida consisted of snorkeling over the abundant coral reefs right off Clearwater Beach, wrestling alligators in the Hillsborough river and riding wild boar through the pan handle. Okay…okay…just kidding. Reality is that none of this happened. But, you know what did? A lot of eat-drink-and-be-merry with family and friends, many bubble baths, yoga out the yin yang and the best weather the sunshine state has to offer (cool mornings with sun and 70s during the day).
Our first stop was Adrian’s parent’s beautiful home in Lithia, FL. We squeezed the fam, including Mama (Ade’s grandma) and Aunt Melinda and we were all off to the Latin Cafe for mofongo! I dream about this stuff. Mofongo is a Puerto Rican dish made of smashed plantains, garlic, onions and crispy pieces of pork. The Latin Cafe’s version sits in a vinegar-based broth, which sends my tastebuds through the roof! We also got to make pastelillos (empanadas) and Puerto Rican spaghetti with Mama. Mmmm. All this eating was followed with morning yoga in the sunny lanai, a beautiful setting to practice.
After a few nights in Lithia, Adrian was off to Poza Rica, Mexico for the Cumbre Tajin music festival where Primus opened for Tool and I went to Clearwater to stay with my best friend Bri and visit with her fam. I taught yoga by the pool to Bri and her 4-year old son, Kai and attended a class at a local studio. We played in the park, ran errands and prepared delicious meals. After five months of eating out for every meal, it’s a real treat to prepare and eat fresh, healthy meals. I also got to see little Kai play in his soccer game and witnessed his first goal! Goal or no goal, Aunt Jenny was proud and beaming with joy.
While all this was going on, Adrian had a full day of travel, one day of work at the festival and a full day of travel back with a trip to the Tajin pyramids squeezed in. An exhausted Adrian met me at Bri’s and rolled into bed. Before we knew it, we were up and at ‘em for an early morning paddle practice with Bri and her hubby, Jean. They run the Kai Aniani canoe club with about 30 members that practice multiple times a week and compete in outrigger canoe competitions around the country. Basically, they are bad a$$es. Then a trip to Frenchie’s for she-crab soup and a grouper sandwich followed by a tasty crableg dinner prepared by Bri’s mom (my second mom), Bridget. We were in a food coma fit for kings.
An hour drive to Bradenton and we were standing face to face with the man, the myth, the legend, Val Sawhill and his lovely, ever-so-patient wife, Deb. Val and Deb are my longtime friend Nikki’s parents whom used to live in Akron, Ohio, but now go back and forth from Ohio to Florida. More accurately, I think the term to describe this behavior is snow birdism. Val, a seasoned SE Asian adventurer, was a huge help to us as we prepared for our trip. Many emails were sent and filled with much-needed advice and he even created a little treasure hunt for us in Bangkok. Val and Deb took Adrian and I to their favorite Thai restaurant and to be honest I was a bit nervous after growing accustomed to eating the real deal in Thailand, but this place did not disappoint. The penang curry with duck was insane! The best duck we’ve ever had. No joke. Publix’ keylime pie and Deb’s homemade clementine cake awaited back home. Have I mentioned how much I love to eat and talk about food?! We loved the discussions, laughs and company, but after a night’s stay, us gypsies were on the move.
An hour drive and we arrived to Ingo and Lindsey (Loo Hoo’s) home in Tampa. We were greeted by the new parents and their 7-month old baby boy, Falko. Finally, we got to meet the little butter ball! Ingo asked if we wanted his homemade spaetzle with creamy, herbalicious mushroom sauce for dinner. Like he really needed to ask! I think we all know what the answer was. The next morning, yoga on the back deck with the chickens in a brisk 47 degrees. It eventually warmed up and more yoga with our friend, Bernie who came over for a yoga session during his lunch break. Bernie is Malay and insanely flexible, which adds evidence to my theory that all Asians are naturally flexible. If you’ve ever seen how Asians sit AKA squat then you know what I mean.
That evening we went to my fave Tampa bar, Fly (Adrian and I’s first date spot), for a bite, couple of drinks and to meet up with some old friends. We got to visit with Bonnie, her hubby Gary and their super cute 1-year old son. Natalie and Melissa (Melisun), my ye olde copy shoppe bias (former coworkers) met us out and we talked and laughed for hours. Twas a magical evening.
The next day we were back to Lithia to spend the weekend with Adrian’s fam and of course, copious amounts of food were indulged. Something happened in the Sanchez household about a year ago. Adrian’s dad, Jose, started cooking. And, I like it. Jose said he’s become a Renaissance man. Well, he must have picked up some tips from Mama after all these years, because his bacalao (salted cod with plantains, avocados, tomatoes, onions and potatoes all drenched in EVOO), sautéed skirt steak with onions and vinegar, and octopus salad delighted every single one of my tastebuds. When we weren’t stuffing our faces, we were taking salsa lessons and peaceful walks along the nearby forest preserve with Adrian’s parents, watching movies with the fam and I taught a Sunday morning yoga class in the living room. Sanchez fam = future yogis! We even managed to get healthcare through the marketplace prior to the March 31 deadline and I filed my taxes. Starting to feel more like an American human.
A 7-hour drive and we were in the pan handle of the state, Pensacola. It’s here where Adrian’s friend, Kevin owns a machine shop, Electrical Guitar Company, where he builds custom aluminum guitars for big-name musicians. This guy is doing the damn thing. A few hours in the shop, din with Kevin and his wife, Hillary at the famous Maguires Irish Pub and a night’s stay at our first western hotel (a crummy Day’s Inn that somewhat feels like a 5-star hotel) since we’ve been back in the states and now we’re on the road again.
Big thanks to Aleida, Jose, Mama, Melinda, Bri, Jean, Kai, Bridget, Mark, Val, Deb, Loo Hoo, Ingo, Bernie, Bonnie, Gary, Dean, Melisun, Natalie, Kevin and Hillary for making these past two weeks simply amazing. We are blessed to have such amazing family and friends to surround ourselves with.
Next stop: New Orleans! Our two weeks in Florida consisted of snorkeling over the abundant coral reefs right off Clearwater Beach, wrestling alligators in the Hillsborough river and riding wild boar through the pan handle. Okay…okay…just kidding. Reality is that none of this happened. But, you know what did? A lot of eat-drink-and-be-merry with family and friends, many bubble baths, yoga out the yin yang and the best weather the sunshine state has to offer (cool mornings with sun and 70s during the day).
Our first stop was Adrian’s parent’s beautiful home in Lithia, FL. We squeezed the fam, including Mama (Ade’s grandma) and Aunt Melinda and we were all off to the Latin Cafe for mofongo! I dream about this stuff. Mofongo is a Puerto Rican dish made of smashed plantains, garlic, onions and crispy pieces of pork. The Latin Cafe’s version sits in a vinegar-based broth, which sends my tastebuds through the roof! We also got to make pastelillos (empanadas) and Puerto Rican spaghetti with Mama. Mmmm. All this eating was followed with morning yoga in the sunny lanai, a beautiful setting to practice.
After a few nights in Lithia, Adrian was off to Poza Rica, Mexico for the Cumbre Tajin music festival where Primus opened for Tool and I went to Clearwater to stay with my best friend Bri and visit with her fam. I taught yoga by the pool to Bri and her 4-year old son, Kai and attended a class at a local studio. We played in the park, ran errands and prepared delicious meals. After five months of eating out for every meal, it’s a real treat to prepare and eat fresh, healthy meals. I also got to see little Kai play in his soccer game and witnessed his first goal! Goal or no goal, Aunt Jenny was proud and beaming with joy.
While all this was going on, Adrian had a full day of travel, one day of work at the festival and a full day of travel back with a trip to the Tajin pyramids squeezed in. An exhausted Adrian met me at Bri’s and rolled into bed. Before we knew it, we were up and at ‘em for an early morning paddle practice with Bri and her hubby, Jean. They run the Kai Aniani canoe club with about 30 members that practice multiple times a week and compete in outrigger canoe competitions around the country. Basically, they are bad a$$es. Then a trip to Frenchie’s for she-crab soup and a grouper sandwich followed by a tasty crableg dinner prepared by Bri’s mom (my second mom), Bridget. We were in a food coma fit for kings.
An hour drive to Bradenton and we were standing face to face with the man, the myth, the legend, Val Sawhill and his lovely, ever-so-patient wife, Deb. Val and Deb are my longtime friend Nikki’s parents whom used to live in Akron, Ohio, but now go back and forth from Ohio to Florida. More accurately, I think the term to describe this behavior is snow birdism. Val, a seasoned SE Asian adventurer, was a huge help to us as we prepared for our trip. Many emails were sent and filled with much-needed advice and he even created a little treasure hunt for us in Bangkok. Val and Deb took Adrian and I to their favorite Thai restaurant and to be honest I was a bit nervous after growing accustomed to eating the real deal in Thailand, but this place did not disappoint. The penang curry with duck was insane! The best duck we’ve ever had. No joke. Publix’ keylime pie and Deb’s homemade clementine cake awaited back home. Have I mentioned how much I love to eat and talk about food?! We loved the discussions, laughs and company, but after a night’s stay, us gypsies were on the move.
An hour drive and we arrived to Ingo and Lindsey (Loo Hoo’s) home in Tampa. We were greeted by the new parents and their 7-month old baby boy, Falko. Finally, we got to meet the little butter ball! Ingo asked if we wanted his homemade spaetzle with creamy, herbalicious mushroom sauce for dinner. Like he really needed to ask! I think we all know what the answer was. The next morning, yoga on the back deck with the chickens in a brisk 47 degrees. It eventually warmed up and more yoga with our friend, Bernie who came over for a yoga session during his lunch break. Bernie is Malay and insanely flexible, which adds evidence to my theory that all Asians are naturally flexible. If you’ve ever seen how Asians sit AKA squat then you know what I mean.
That evening we went to my fave Tampa bar, Fly (Adrian and I’s first date spot), for a bite, couple of drinks and to meet up with some old friends. We got to visit with Bonnie, her hubby Gary and their super cute 1-year old son. Natalie and Melissa (Melisun), my ye olde copy shoppe bias (former coworkers) met us out and we talked and laughed for hours. Twas a magical evening.
The next day we were back to Lithia to spend the weekend with Adrian’s fam and of course, copious amounts of food were indulged. Something happened in the Sanchez household about a year ago. Adrian’s dad, Jose, started cooking. And, I like it. Jose said he’s become a Renaissance man. Well, he must have picked up some tips from Mama after all these years, because his bacalao (salted cod with plantains, avocados, tomatoes, onions and potatoes all drenched in EVOO), sautéed skirt steak with onions and vinegar, and octopus salad delighted every single one of my tastebuds. When we weren’t stuffing our faces, we were taking salsa lessons and peaceful walks along the nearby forest preserve with Adrian’s parents, watching movies with the fam and I taught a Sunday morning yoga class in the living room. Sanchez fam = future yogis! We even managed to get healthcare through the marketplace prior to the March 31 deadline and I filed my taxes. Starting to feel more like an American human.
A 7-hour drive and we were in the pan handle of the state, Pensacola. It’s here where Adrian’s friend, Kevin owns a machine shop, Electrical Guitar Company, where he builds custom aluminum guitars for big-name musicians. This guy is doing the damn thing. A few hours in the shop, din with Kevin and his wife, Hillary at the famous Maguires Irish Pub and a night’s stay at our first western hotel (a crummy Day’s Inn that somewhat feels like a 5-star hotel) since we’ve been back in the states and now we’re on the road again.
Big thanks to Aleida, Jose, Mama, Melinda, Bri, Jean, Kai, Bridget, Mark, Val, Deb, Loo Hoo, Ingo, Bernie, Bonnie, Gary, Dean, Melisun, Natalie, Kevin and Hillary for making these past two weeks simply amazing. We are blessed to have such amazing family and friends to surround ourselves with.
Next stop: New Orleans! Our two weeks in Florida consisted of snorkeling over the abundant coral reefs right off Clearwater Beach, wrestling alligators in the Hillsborough river and riding wild boar through the pan handle. Okay…okay…just kidding. Reality is that none of this happened. But, you know what did? A lot of eat-drink-and-be-merry with family and friends, many bubble baths, yoga out the yin yang and the best weather the sunshine state has to offer (cool mornings with sun and 70s during the day).
Our first stop was Adrian’s parent’s beautiful home in Lithia, FL. We squeezed the fam, including Mama (Ade’s grandma) and Aunt Melinda and we were all off to the Latin Cafe for mofongo! I dream about this stuff. Mofongo is a Puerto Rican dish made of smashed plantains, garlic, onions and crispy pieces of pork. The Latin Cafe’s version sits in a vinegar-based broth, which sends my tastebuds through the roof! We also got to make pastelillos (empanadas) and Puerto Rican spaghetti with Mama. Mmmm. All this eating was followed with morning yoga in the sunny lanai, a beautiful setting to practice.
After a few nights in Lithia, Adrian was off to Poza Rica, Mexico for the Cumbre Tajin music festival where Primus opened for Tool and I went to Clearwater to stay with my best friend Bri and visit with her fam. I taught yoga by the pool to Bri and her 4-year old son, Kai and attended a class at a local studio. We played in the park, ran errands and prepared delicious meals. After five months of eating out for every meal, it’s a real treat to prepare and eat fresh, healthy meals. I also got to see little Kai play in his soccer game and witnessed his first goal! Goal or no goal, Aunt Jenny was proud and beaming with joy.
While all this was going on, Adrian had a full day of travel, one day of work at the festival and a full day of travel back with a trip to the Tajin pyramids squeezed in. An exhausted Adrian met me at Bri’s and rolled into bed. Before we knew it, we were up and at ‘em for an early morning paddle practice with Bri and her hubby, Jean. They run the Kai Aniani canoe club with about 30 members that practice multiple times a week and compete in outrigger canoe competitions around the country. Basically, they are bad a$$es. Then a trip to Frenchie’s for she-crab soup and a grouper sandwich followed by a tasty crableg dinner prepared by Bri’s mom (my second mom), Bridget. We were in a food coma fit for kings.
An hour drive to Bradenton and we were standing face to face with the man, the myth, the legend, Val Sawhill and his lovely, ever-so-patient wife, Deb. Val and Deb are my longtime friend Nikki’s parents whom used to live in Akron, Ohio, but now go back and forth from Ohio to Florida. More accurately, I think the term to describe this behavior is snow birdism. Val, a seasoned SE Asian adventurer, was a huge help to us as we prepared for our trip. Many emails were sent and filled with much-needed advice and he even created a little treasure hunt for us in Bangkok. Val and Deb took Adrian and I to their favorite Thai restaurant and to be honest I was a bit nervous after growing accustomed to eating the real deal in Thailand, but this place did not disappoint. The penang curry with duck was insane! The best duck we’ve ever had. No joke. Publix’ keylime pie and Deb’s homemade clementine cake awaited back home. Have I mentioned how much I love to eat and talk about food?! We loved the discussions, laughs and company, but after a night’s stay, us gypsies were on the move.
An hour drive and we arrived to Ingo and Lindsey (Loo Hoo’s) home in Tampa. We were greeted by the new parents and their 7-month old baby boy, Falko. Finally, we got to meet the little butter ball! Ingo asked if we wanted his homemade spaetzle with creamy, herbalicious mushroom sauce for dinner. Like he really needed to ask! I think we all know what the answer was. The next morning, yoga on the back deck with the chickens in a brisk 47 degrees. It eventually warmed up and more yoga with our friend, Bernie who came over for a yoga session during his lunch break. Bernie is Malay and insanely flexible, which adds evidence to my theory that all Asians are naturally flexible. If you’ve ever seen how Asians sit AKA squat then you know what I mean.
That evening we went to my fave Tampa bar, Fly (Adrian and I’s first date spot), for a bite, couple of drinks and to meet up with some old friends. We got to visit with Bonnie, her hubby Gary and their super cute 1-year old son. Natalie and Melissa (Melisun), my ye olde copy shoppe bias (former coworkers) met us out and we talked and laughed for hours. Twas a magical evening.
The next day we were back to Lithia to spend the weekend with Adrian’s fam and of course, copious amounts of food were indulged. Something happened in the Sanchez household about a year ago. Adrian’s dad, Jose, started cooking. And, I like it. Jose said he’s become a Renaissance man. Well, he must have picked up some tips from Mama after all these years, because his bacalao (salted cod with plantains, avocados, tomatoes, onions and potatoes all drenched in EVOO), sautéed skirt steak with onions and vinegar, and octopus salad delighted every single one of my tastebuds. When we weren’t stuffing our faces, we were taking salsa lessons and peaceful walks along the nearby forest preserve with Adrian’s parents, watching movies with the fam and I taught a Sunday morning yoga class in the living room. Sanchez fam = future yogis! We even managed to get healthcare through the marketplace prior to the March 31 deadline and I filed my taxes. Starting to feel more like an American human.
A 7-hour drive and we were in the pan handle of the state, Pensacola. It’s here where Adrian’s friend, Kevin owns a machine shop, Electrical Guitar Company, where he builds custom aluminum guitars for big-name musicians. This guy is doing the damn thing. A few hours in the shop, din with Kevin and his wife, Hillary at the famous Maguires Irish Pub and a night’s stay at our first western hotel (a crummy Day’s Inn that somewhat feels like a 5-star hotel) since we’ve been back in the states and now we’re on the road again.
Big thanks to Aleida, Jose, Mama, Melinda, Bri, Jean, Kai, Bridget, Mark, Val, Deb, Loo Hoo, Ingo, Bernie, Bonnie, Gary, Dean, Melisun, Natalie, Kevin and Hillary for making these past two weeks simply amazing. We are blessed to have such amazing family and friends to surround ourselves with.
Next stop: New Orleans! Our two weeks in Florida consisted of snorkeling over the abundant coral reefs right off Clearwater Beach, wrestling alligators in the Hillsborough river and riding wild boar through the pan handle. Okay…okay…just kidding. Reality is that none of this happened. But, you know what did? A lot of eat-drink-and-be-merry with family and friends, many bubble baths, yoga out the yin yang and the best weather the sunshine state has to offer (cool mornings with sun and 70s during the day).
Our first stop was Adrian’s parent’s beautiful home in Lithia, FL. We squeezed the fam, including Mama (Ade’s grandma) and Aunt Melinda and we were all off to the Latin Cafe for mofongo! I dream about this stuff. Mofongo is a Puerto Rican dish made of smashed plantains, garlic, onions and crispy pieces of pork. The Latin Cafe’s version sits in a vinegar-based broth, which sends my tastebuds through the roof! We also got to make pastelillos (empanadas) and Puerto Rican spaghetti with Mama. Mmmm. All this eating was followed with morning yoga in the sunny lanai, a beautiful setting to practice.
After a few nights in Lithia, Adrian was off to Poza Rica, Mexico for the Cumbre Tajin music festival where Primus opened for Tool and I went to Clearwater to stay with my best friend Bri and visit with her fam. I taught yoga by the pool to Bri and her 4-year old son, Kai and attended a class at a local studio. We played in the park, ran errands and prepared delicious meals. After five months of eating out for every meal, it’s a real treat to prepare and eat fresh, healthy meals. I also got to see little Kai play in his soccer game and witnessed his first goal! Goal or no goal, Aunt Jenny was proud and beaming with joy.
While all this was going on, Adrian had a full day of travel, one day of work at the festival and a full day of travel back with a trip to the Tajin pyramids squeezed in. An exhausted Adrian met me at Bri’s and rolled into bed. Before we knew it, we were up and at ‘em for an early morning paddle practice with Bri and her hubby, Jean. They run the Kai Aniani canoe club with about 30 members that practice multiple times a week and compete in outrigger canoe competitions around the country. Basically, they are bad a$$es. Then a trip to Frenchie’s for she-crab soup and a grouper sandwich followed by a tasty crableg dinner prepared by Bri’s mom (my second mom), Bridget. We were in a food coma fit for kings.
An hour drive to Bradenton and we were standing face to face with the man, the myth, the legend, Val Sawhill and his lovely, ever-so-patient wife, Deb. Val and Deb are my longtime friend Nikki’s parents whom used to live in Akron, Ohio, but now go back and forth from Ohio to Florida. More accurately, I think the term to describe this behavior is snow birdism. Val, a seasoned SE Asian adventurer, was a huge help to us as we prepared for our trip. Many emails were sent and filled with much-needed advice and he even created a little treasure hunt for us in Bangkok. Val and Deb took Adrian and I to their favorite Thai restaurant and to be honest I was a bit nervous after growing accustomed to eating the real deal in Thailand, but this place did not disappoint. The penang curry with duck was insane! The best duck we’ve ever had. No joke. Publix’ keylime pie and Deb’s homemade clementine cake awaited back home. Have I mentioned how much I love to eat and talk about food?! We loved the discussions, laughs and company, but after a night’s stay, us gypsies were on the move.
An hour drive and we arrived to Ingo and Lindsey (Loo Hoo’s) home in Tampa. We were greeted by the new parents and their 7-month old baby boy, Falko. Finally, we got to meet the little butter ball! Ingo asked if we wanted his homemade spaetzle with creamy, herbalicious mushroom sauce for dinner. Like he really needed to ask! I think we all know what the answer was. The next morning, yoga on the back deck with the chickens in a brisk 47 degrees. It eventually warmed up and more yoga with our friend, Bernie who came over for a yoga session during his lunch break. Bernie is Malay and insanely flexible, which adds evidence to my theory that all Asians are naturally flexible. If you’ve ever seen how Asians sit AKA squat then you know what I mean.
That evening we went to my fave Tampa bar, Fly (Adrian and I’s first date spot), for a bite, couple of drinks and to meet up with some old friends. We got to visit with Bonnie, her hubby Gary and their super cute 1-year old son. Natalie and Melissa (Melisun), my ye olde copy shoppe bias (former coworkers) met us out and we talked and laughed for hours. Twas a magical evening.
The next day we were back to Lithia to spend the weekend with Adrian’s fam and of course, copious amounts of food were indulged. Something happened in the Sanchez household about a year ago. Adrian’s dad, Jose, started cooking. And, I like it. Jose said he’s become a Renaissance man. Well, he must have picked up some tips from Mama after all these years, because his bacalao (salted cod with plantains, avocados, tomatoes, onions and potatoes all drenched in EVOO), sautéed skirt steak with onions and vinegar, and octopus salad delighted every single one of my tastebuds. When we weren’t stuffing our faces, we were taking salsa lessons and peaceful walks along the nearby forest preserve with Adrian’s parents, watching movies with the fam and I taught a Sunday morning yoga class in the living room. Sanchez fam = future yogis! We even managed to get healthcare through the marketplace prior to the March 31 deadline and I filed my taxes. Starting to feel more like an American human.
A 7-hour drive and we were in the pan handle of the state, Pensacola. It’s here where Adrian’s friend, Kevin owns a machine shop, Electrical Guitar Company, where he builds custom aluminum guitars for big-name musicians. This guy is doing the damn thing. A few hours in the shop, din with Kevin and his wife, Hillary at the famous Maguires Irish Pub and a night’s stay at our first western hotel (a crummy Day’s Inn that somewhat feels like a 5-star hotel) since we’ve been back in the states and now we’re on the road again.
Big thanks to Aleida, Jose, Mama, Melinda, Bri, Jean, Kai, Bridget, Mark, Val, Deb, Loo Hoo, Ingo, Bernie, Bonnie, Gary, Dean, Melisun, Natalie, Kevin and Hillary for making these past two weeks simply amazing. We are blessed to have such amazing family and friends to surround ourselves with.
Next stop: New Orleans! Our two weeks in Florida consisted of snorkeling over the abundant coral reefs right off Clearwater Beach, wrestling alligators in the Hillsborough river and riding wild boar through the pan handle. Okay…okay…just kidding. Reality is that none of this happened. But, you know what did? A lot of eat-drink-and-be-merry with family and friends, many bubble baths, yoga out the yin yang and the best weather the sunshine state has to offer (cool mornings with sun and 70s during the day).
Our first stop was Adrian’s parent’s beautiful home in Lithia, FL. We squeezed the fam, including Mama (Ade’s grandma) and Aunt Melinda and we were all off to the Latin Cafe for mofongo! I dream about this stuff. Mofongo is a Puerto Rican dish made of smashed plantains, garlic, onions and crispy pieces of pork. The Latin Cafe’s version sits in a vinegar-based broth, which sends my tastebuds through the roof! We also got to make pastelillos (empanadas) and Puerto Rican spaghetti with Mama. Mmmm. All this eating was followed with morning yoga in the sunny lanai, a beautiful setting to practice.
After a few nights in Lithia, Adrian was off to Poza Rica, Mexico for the Cumbre Tajin music festival where Primus opened for Tool and I went to Clearwater to stay with my best friend Bri and visit with her fam. I taught yoga by the pool to Bri and her 4-year old son, Kai and attended a class at a local studio. We played in the park, ran errands and prepared delicious meals. After five months of eating out for every meal, it’s a real treat to prepare and eat fresh, healthy meals. I also got to see little Kai play in his soccer game and witnessed his first goal! Goal or no goal, Aunt Jenny was proud and beaming with joy.
While all this was going on, Adrian had a full day of travel, one day of work at the festival and a full day of travel back with a trip to the Tajin pyramids squeezed in. An exhausted Adrian met me at Bri’s and rolled into bed. Before we knew it, we were up and at ‘em for an early morning paddle practice with Bri and her hubby, Jean. They run the Kai Aniani canoe club with about 30 members that practice multiple times a week and compete in outrigger canoe competitions around the country. Basically, they are bad a$$es. Then a trip to Frenchie’s for she-crab soup and a grouper sandwich followed by a tasty crableg dinner prepared by Bri’s mom (my second mom), Bridget. We were in a food coma fit for kings.
An hour drive to Bradenton and we were standing face to face with the man, the myth, the legend, Val Sawhill and his lovely, ever-so-patient wife, Deb. Val and Deb are my longtime friend Nikki’s parents whom used to live in Akron, Ohio, but now go back and forth from Ohio to Florida. More accurately, I think the term to describe this behavior is snow birdism. Val, a seasoned SE Asian adventurer, was a huge help to us as we prepared for our trip. Many emails were sent and filled with much-needed advice and he even created a little treasure hunt for us in Bangkok. Val and Deb took Adrian and I to their favorite Thai restaurant and to be honest I was a bit nervous after growing accustomed to eating the real deal in Thailand, but this place did not disappoint. The penang curry with duck was insane! The best duck we’ve ever had. No joke. Publix’ keylime pie and Deb’s homemade clementine cake awaited back home. Have I mentioned how much I love to eat and talk about food?! We loved the discussions, laughs and company, but after a night’s stay, us gypsies were on the move.
An hour drive and we arrived to Ingo and Lindsey (Loo Hoo’s) home in Tampa. We were greeted by the new parents and their 7-month old baby boy, Falko. Finally, we got to meet the little butter ball! Ingo asked if we wanted his homemade spaetzle with creamy, herbalicious mushroom sauce for dinner. Like he really needed to ask! I think we all know what the answer was. The next morning, yoga on the back deck with the chickens in a brisk 47 degrees. It eventually warmed up and more yoga with our friend, Bernie who came over for a yoga session during his lunch break. Bernie is Malay and insanely flexible, which adds evidence to my theory that all Asians are naturally flexible. If you’ve ever seen how Asians sit AKA squat then you know what I mean.
That evening we went to my fave Tampa bar, Fly (Adrian and I’s first date spot), for a bite, couple of drinks and to meet up with some old friends. We got to visit with Bonnie, her hubby Gary and their super cute 1-year old son. Natalie and Melissa (Melisun), my ye olde copy shoppe bias (former coworkers) met us out and we talked and laughed for hours. Twas a magical evening.
The next day we were back to Lithia to spend the weekend with Adrian’s fam and of course, copious amounts of food were indulged. Something happened in the Sanchez household about a year ago. Adrian’s dad, Jose, started cooking. And, I like it. Jose said he’s become a Renaissance man. Well, he must have picked up some tips from Mama after all these years, because his bacalao (salted cod with plantains, avocados, tomatoes, onions and potatoes all drenched in EVOO), sautéed skirt steak with onions and vinegar, and octopus salad delighted every single one of my tastebuds. When we weren’t stuffing our faces, we were taking salsa lessons and peaceful walks along the nearby forest preserve with Adrian’s parents, watching movies with the fam and I taught a Sunday morning yoga class in the living room. Sanchez fam = future yogis! We even managed to get healthcare through the marketplace prior to the March 31 deadline and I filed my taxes. Starting to feel more like an American human.
A 7-hour drive and we were in the pan handle of the state, Pensacola. It’s here where Adrian’s friend, Kevin owns a machine shop, Electrical Guitar Company, where he builds custom aluminum guitars for big-name musicians. This guy is doing the damn thing. A few hours in the shop, din with Kevin and his wife, Hillary at the famous Maguires Irish Pub and a night’s stay at our first western hotel (a crummy Day’s Inn that somewhat feels like a 5-star hotel) since we’ve been back in the states and now we’re on the road again.
Big thanks to Aleida, Jose, Mama, Melinda, Bri, Jean, Kai, Bridget, Mark, Val, Deb, Loo Hoo, Ingo, Bernie, Bonnie, Gary, Dean, Melisun, Natalie, Kevin and Hillary for making these past two weeks simply amazing. We are blessed to have such amazing family and friends to surround ourselves with.
Next stop: New Orleans! Our two weeks in Florida consisted of snorkeling over the abundant coral reefs right off Clearwater Beach, wrestling alligators in the Hillsborough river and riding wild boar through the pan handle. Okay…okay…just kidding. Reality is that none of this happened. But, you know what did? A lot of eat-drink-and-be-merry with family and friends, many bubble baths, yoga out the yin yang and the best weather the sunshine state has to offer (cool mornings with sun and 70s during the day).
Our first stop was Adrian’s parent’s beautiful home in Lithia, FL. We squeezed the fam, including Mama (Ade’s grandma) and Aunt Melinda and we were all off to the Latin Cafe for mofongo! I dream about this stuff. Mofongo is a Puerto Rican dish made of smashed plantains, garlic, onions and crispy pieces of pork. The Latin Cafe’s version sits in a vinegar-based broth, which sends my tastebuds through the roof! We also got to make pastelillos (empanadas) and Puerto Rican spaghetti with Mama. Mmmm. All this eating was followed with morning yoga in the sunny lanai, a beautiful setting to practice.
After a few nights in Lithia, Adrian was off to Poza Rica, Mexico for the Cumbre Tajin music festival where Primus opened for Tool and I went to Clearwater to stay with my best friend Bri and visit with her fam. I taught yoga by the pool to Bri and her 4-year old son, Kai and attended a class at a local studio. We played in the park, ran errands and prepared delicious meals. After five months of eating out for every meal, it’s a real treat to prepare and eat fresh, healthy meals. I also got to see little Kai play in his soccer game and witnessed his first goal! Goal or no goal, Aunt Jenny was proud and beaming with joy.
While all this was going on, Adrian had a full day of travel, one day of work at the festival and a full day of travel back with a trip to the Tajin pyramids squeezed in. An exhausted Adrian met me at Bri’s and rolled into bed. Before we knew it, we were up and at ‘em for an early morning paddle practice with Bri and her hubby, Jean. They run the Kai Aniani canoe club with about 30 members that practice multiple times a week and compete in outrigger canoe competitions around the country. Basically, they are bad a$$es. Then a trip to Frenchie’s for she-crab soup and a grouper sandwich followed by a tasty crableg dinner prepared by Bri’s mom (my second mom), Bridget. We were in a food coma fit for kings.
An hour drive to Bradenton and we were standing face to face with the man, the myth, the legend, Val Sawhill and his lovely, ever-so-patient wife, Deb. Val and Deb are my longtime friend Nikki’s parents whom used to live in Akron, Ohio, but now go back and forth from Ohio to Florida. More accurately, I think the term to describe this behavior is snow birdism. Val, a seasoned SE Asian adventurer, was a huge help to us as we prepared for our trip. Many emails were sent and filled with much-needed advice and he even created a little treasure hunt for us in Bangkok. Val and Deb took Adrian and I to their favorite Thai restaurant and to be honest I was a bit nervous after growing accustomed to eating the real deal in Thailand, but this place did not disappoint. The penang curry with duck was insane! The best duck we’ve ever had. No joke. Publix’ keylime pie and Deb’s homemade clementine cake awaited back home. Have I mentioned how much I love to eat and talk about food?! We loved the discussions, laughs and company, but after a night’s stay, us gypsies were on the move.
An hour drive and we arrived to Ingo and Lindsey (Loo Hoo’s) home in Tampa. We were greeted by the new parents and their 7-month old baby boy, Falko. Finally, we got to meet the little butter ball! Ingo asked if we wanted his homemade spaetzle with creamy, herbalicious mushroom sauce for dinner. Like he really needed to ask! I think we all know what the answer was. The next morning, yoga on the back deck with the chickens in a brisk 47 degrees. It eventually warmed up and more yoga with our friend, Bernie who came over for a yoga session during his lunch break. Bernie is Malay and insanely flexible, which adds evidence to my theory that all Asians are naturally flexible. If you’ve ever seen how Asians sit AKA squat then you know what I mean.
That evening we went to my fave Tampa bar, Fly (Adrian and I’s first date spot), for a bite, couple of drinks and to meet up with some old friends. We got to visit with Bonnie, her hubby Gary and their super cute 1-year old son. Natalie and Melissa (Melisun), my ye olde copy shoppe bias (former coworkers) met us out and we talked and laughed for hours. Twas a magical evening.
The next day we were back to Lithia to spend the weekend with Adrian’s fam and of course, copious amounts of food were indulged. Something happened in the Sanchez household about a year ago. Adrian’s dad, Jose, started cooking. And, I like it. Jose said he’s become a Renaissance man. Well, he must have picked up some tips from Mama after all these years, because his bacalao (salted cod with plantains, avocados, tomatoes, onions and potatoes all drenched in EVOO), sautéed skirt steak with onions and vinegar, and octopus salad delighted every single one of my tastebuds. When we weren’t stuffing our faces, we were taking salsa lessons and peaceful walks along the nearby forest preserve with Adrian’s parents, watching movies with the fam and I taught a Sunday morning yoga class in the living room. Sanchez fam = future yogis! We even managed to get healthcare through the marketplace prior to the March 31 deadline and I filed my taxes. Starting to feel more like an American human.
A 7-hour drive and we were in the pan handle of the state, Pensacola. It’s here where Adrian’s friend, Kevin owns a machine shop, Electrical Guitar Company, where he builds custom aluminum guitars for big-name musicians. This guy is doing the damn thing. A few hours in the shop, din with Kevin and his wife, Hillary at the famous Maguires Irish Pub and a night’s stay at our first western hotel (a crummy Day’s Inn that somewhat feels like a 5-star hotel) since we’ve been back in the states and now we’re on the road again.
Big thanks to Aleida, Jose, Mama, Melinda, Bri, Jean, Kai, Bridget, Mark, Val, Deb, Loo Hoo, Ingo, Bernie, Bonnie, Gary, Dean, Melisun, Natalie, Kevin and Hillary for making these past two weeks simply amazing. We are blessed to have such amazing family and friends to surround ourselves with.
Next stop: New Orleans!

Our two weeks in Florida consisted of snorkeling over the abundant coral reefs right off Clearwater Beach, wrestling alligators in the Hillsborough river and riding wild boar through the pan handle. Okay…okay…just kidding. Reality is that none of this happened. But, you know what did? A lot of eat-drink-and-be-merry with family and friends, many bubble baths, yoga out the yin yang and the best weather the sunshine state has to offer (cool mornings with sun and 70s during the day).

Our first stop was Adrian’s parent’s beautiful home in Lithia, FL. We squeezed the fam, including Mama (Ade’s grandma) and Aunt Melinda and we were all off to the Latin Cafe for mofongo! I dream about this stuff. Mofongo is a Puerto Rican dish made of smashed plantains, garlic, onions and crispy pieces of pork. The Latin Cafe’s version sits in a vinegar-based broth, which sends my tastebuds through the roof! We also got to make pastelillos (empanadas) and Puerto Rican spaghetti with Mama. Mmmm. All this eating was followed with morning yoga in the sunny lanai, a beautiful setting to practice.

After a few nights in Lithia, Adrian was off to Poza Rica, Mexico for the Cumbre Tajin music festival where Primus opened for Tool and I went to Clearwater to stay with my best friend Bri and visit with her fam. I taught yoga by the pool to Bri and her 4-year old son, Kai and attended a class at a local studio. We played in the park, ran errands and prepared delicious meals. After five months of eating out for every meal, it’s a real treat to prepare and eat fresh, healthy meals. I also got to see little Kai play in his soccer game and witnessed his first goal! Goal or no goal, Aunt Jenny was proud and beaming with joy.

While all this was going on, Adrian had a full day of travel, one day of work at the festival and a full day of travel back with a trip to the Tajin pyramids squeezed in. An exhausted Adrian met me at Bri’s and rolled into bed. Before we knew it, we were up and at ‘em for an early morning paddle practice with Bri and her hubby, Jean. They run the Kai Aniani canoe club with about 30 members that practice multiple times a week and compete in outrigger canoe competitions around the country. Basically, they are bad a$$es. Then a trip to Frenchie’s for she-crab soup and a grouper sandwich followed by a tasty crableg dinner prepared by Bri’s mom (my second mom), Bridget. We were in a food coma fit for kings.

An hour drive to Bradenton and we were standing face to face with the man, the myth, the legend, Val Sawhill and his lovely, ever-so-patient wife, Deb. Val and Deb are my longtime friend Nikki’s parents whom used to live in Akron, Ohio, but now go back and forth from Ohio to Florida. More accurately, I think the term to describe this behavior is snow birdism. Val, a seasoned SE Asian adventurer, was a huge help to us as we prepared for our trip. Many emails were sent and filled with much-needed advice and he even created a little treasure hunt for us in Bangkok. Val and Deb took Adrian and I to their favorite Thai restaurant and to be honest I was a bit nervous after growing accustomed to eating the real deal in Thailand, but this place did not disappoint. The penang curry with duck was insane! The best duck we’ve ever had. No joke. Publix’ keylime pie and Deb’s homemade clementine cake awaited back home. Have I mentioned how much I love to eat and talk about food?! We loved the discussions, laughs and company, but after a night’s stay, us gypsies were on the move.

An hour drive and we arrived to Ingo and Lindsey (Loo Hoo’s) home in Tampa. We were greeted by the new parents and their 7-month old baby boy, Falko. Finally, we got to meet the little butter ball! Ingo asked if we wanted his homemade spaetzle with creamy, herbalicious mushroom sauce for dinner. Like he really needed to ask! I think we all know what the answer was. The next morning, yoga on the back deck with the chickens in a brisk 47 degrees. It eventually warmed up and more yoga with our friend, Bernie who came over for a yoga session during his lunch break. Bernie is Malay and insanely flexible, which adds evidence to my theory that all Asians are naturally flexible. If you’ve ever seen how Asians sit AKA squat then you know what I mean.

That evening we went to my fave Tampa bar, Fly (Adrian and I’s first date spot), for a bite, couple of drinks and to meet up with some old friends. We got to visit with Bonnie, her hubby Gary and their super cute 1-year old son. Natalie and Melissa (Melisun), my ye olde copy shoppe bias (former coworkers) met us out and we talked and laughed for hours. Twas a magical evening.

The next day we were back to Lithia to spend the weekend with Adrian’s fam and of course, copious amounts of food were indulged. Something happened in the Sanchez household about a year ago. Adrian’s dad, Jose, started cooking. And, I like it. Jose said he’s become a Renaissance man. Well, he must have picked up some tips from Mama after all these years, because his bacalao (salted cod with plantains, avocados, tomatoes, onions and potatoes all drenched in EVOO), sautéed skirt steak with onions and vinegar, and octopus salad delighted every single one of my tastebuds. When we weren’t stuffing our faces, we were taking salsa lessons and peaceful walks along the nearby forest preserve with Adrian’s parents, watching movies with the fam and I taught a Sunday morning yoga class in the living room. Sanchez fam = future yogis! We even managed to get healthcare through the marketplace prior to the March 31 deadline and I filed my taxes. Starting to feel more like an American human.

A 7-hour drive and we were in the pan handle of the state, Pensacola. It’s here where Adrian’s friend, Kevin owns a machine shop, Electrical Guitar Company, where he builds custom aluminum guitars for big-name musicians. This guy is doing the damn thing. A few hours in the shop, din with Kevin and his wife, Hillary at the famous Maguires Irish Pub and a night’s stay at our first western hotel (a crummy Day’s Inn that somewhat feels like a 5-star hotel) since we’ve been back in the states and now we’re on the road again.

Big thanks to Aleida, Jose, Mama, Melinda, Bri, Jean, Kai, Bridget, Mark, Val, Deb, Loo Hoo, Ingo, Bernie, Bonnie, Gary, Dean, Melisun, Natalie, Kevin and Hillary for making these past two weeks simply amazing. We are blessed to have such amazing family and friends to surround ourselves with.

Next stop: New Orleans!

We flew into Chicago from Bali after layovers in Hong Kong and LA. Cold temps, snow and a storage unit covered in ice awaited us. I only shed a couple tears at the airport and quickly recovered from a would-have-been meltdown. Nope, no meltdowns here! I was practicing non-attachment. Something I read about in the Yoga Sutras and discussed in my yoga course. I was not going to attach myself and hold on to this experience as it was coming to an end. I didn’t want this incredible trip to turn into pain, because we wouldn’t be traveling there anymore. We did the damn thing, we lived it to the fullest and we will never forget. But, instead of longing for it when it was over, I would keep the memories in my heart and then let it go. After all, there will be more traveling in the future. We’re already thinking about South America next winter. :) And, we’ve got work to do. Big, exciting changes ahead for Adrian and me. For now, we will focus on the present and see what happens. Bit by bit.
Nearly 40 hours of travel and we were hit smack in the face with the aftermath of the polar vortex. Adrian’s friend, Patrick, picked us up from the airport and helped us shovel out the snow in front of our storage unit. We opened the door and there sat Adrian’s car and our mound of sh!t-we-don’t-need sitting atop two inches of ice. Adrian’s car managed to start up no problem (Honda’s rock)! We grabbed small suitcases filled with some warmer clothing, because flip flops and light sweaters weren’t cutting it. Too bad our clothes were frozen solid in our suitcases.
Our friend, Molly, the one that spent a couple weeks with us in Thailand, graciously let us stay at her apartment for a few nights while she was becoming famous and giving speeches on mobile marketing at the SXSW festival in Austin, TX. As we drove to Molly’s to thaw out, I was shocked at the eyesore that is Chicago winter. Everything is dead. Bare trees, grey slush from halfway melted snow and no wildlife in site. Where was all the green? Where was the sunshine? Where were all the temples? Why weren’t we profusely sweating? We had just spent five months living in paradise after paradise and even when we were in big, dirty cities they were still vibrant and full of colorful life. So much for the non-attachment theory. :) Chicago in March is the pits.
We made it to Molly’s Home-Away-From-Home Retreat, I dropped my bags and immediately drew a bath. It had been five months since I soaked in a tub and let me tell you, it was magical with bath bubbles and all. Ahhhh. And then I got out and covered myself with a towel. Doesn’t sound that great, but this towel was amazing! It covered more than 1/4 of my body and was so fluffy. After attempting to cover up with teeny tiny towels for months, I forgot what towels felt like here. I used my phone to call my mom (actually made a call without using Skype) and to text my sibs (actually texted without using WhatsApp). I forgot 3G existed and became so confused to the fact that I could use the map application, send email and google something on-the-go without a wifi connection. I used a computer for the first time since we left. During our trip I wrote all blog posts, took all pics and researched and booked everything on my iPhone 4. After months of nothing but my phone, I can honestly say for the most part that the mobile web and many mobile apps are complete and utter $hit. There’s a lot of work to be done. To all my fellow user experience and content strategy coworkers, keep surging forward. I made my phone work for five months, but there were several frustrating moments. With these simple forgotten pleasures and some technology, my mood was starting to transform and America was looking up already. Now, it was time for the store. We bundled up with whatever we could and headed out for a brisk walk to Marianos market to pick up a few items for dinner. Fortunately for me, Molly has several winter coats and warm-weather gear. American grocery stores are unbelievable! They’re convenient, have massively wide aisles and whole sections dedicated to cheese. Our trip to the store proved to be overwhelming, exhilarating and expensive. 6:00 PM comes around and we could no longer keep our eyes open. 14-hour time difference got the best of us and we were out.
After two days of an unsuccessful apartment hunt in Chicago, we just weren’t feeling it and drove off to Akron, Ohio to visit my family. A quick, 6-hour drive and then we were greeted with smiling faces, hugs, kisses, gifts and a ridiculous amount of homemade food. My mom and Grandma Johnson put out a spread of homemade lasagna, a fabulous cheese plate, appetizers and chocolate-covered strawberries. Yep, America was still on the up and up!
We spent a week at my parents snuggling with my fam, eating homemade meals (my mom even made pho) and visiting some of my favorite restaurants, e.g. Parisson’s, The Barn, El Rincon and Pav’s for ice cream. Resting and stuffing our faces was just what we needed! We saw my cancer-free brother, Scotty, for the first time since his NHL was declared in remission. We got to spend my brother, Joey’s, 35th birthday with him. I got to catch up with some old friends. And, I turned my parents living room into a mini yoga studio and practiced teaching yoga nearly every day to Adrian and my family (including my 75 year old grandma). Thank you all for being so cooperative and supportive. I even taught my first yoga class on my own to 26 students at the Portage Lakes Fitness Center. The fitness center was my first job when I was 16 (now my baby sis works there) and the place where I took my very first yoga class many years ago. I was stoked and nervous to teach there, but it went really well.
Our week in Akron flew by. We had a fabulous time. There’s no place like home, but us gypsies are on the move. With homemade granola from mamma, brownies from Grandma Bobbie and plenty of other snacks, we headed out for an 18-hour drive to Florida. First stop: Lithia to visit Adrian’s family. Then off to Clearwater, Tampa and Bradenton to visit friends. We can’t wait to see all of our FL peeps, eat Puerto Rican and Cuban food and get back to some sunshine! We flew into Chicago from Bali after layovers in Hong Kong and LA. Cold temps, snow and a storage unit covered in ice awaited us. I only shed a couple tears at the airport and quickly recovered from a would-have-been meltdown. Nope, no meltdowns here! I was practicing non-attachment. Something I read about in the Yoga Sutras and discussed in my yoga course. I was not going to attach myself and hold on to this experience as it was coming to an end. I didn’t want this incredible trip to turn into pain, because we wouldn’t be traveling there anymore. We did the damn thing, we lived it to the fullest and we will never forget. But, instead of longing for it when it was over, I would keep the memories in my heart and then let it go. After all, there will be more traveling in the future. We’re already thinking about South America next winter. :) And, we’ve got work to do. Big, exciting changes ahead for Adrian and me. For now, we will focus on the present and see what happens. Bit by bit.
Nearly 40 hours of travel and we were hit smack in the face with the aftermath of the polar vortex. Adrian’s friend, Patrick, picked us up from the airport and helped us shovel out the snow in front of our storage unit. We opened the door and there sat Adrian’s car and our mound of sh!t-we-don’t-need sitting atop two inches of ice. Adrian’s car managed to start up no problem (Honda’s rock)! We grabbed small suitcases filled with some warmer clothing, because flip flops and light sweaters weren’t cutting it. Too bad our clothes were frozen solid in our suitcases.
Our friend, Molly, the one that spent a couple weeks with us in Thailand, graciously let us stay at her apartment for a few nights while she was becoming famous and giving speeches on mobile marketing at the SXSW festival in Austin, TX. As we drove to Molly’s to thaw out, I was shocked at the eyesore that is Chicago winter. Everything is dead. Bare trees, grey slush from halfway melted snow and no wildlife in site. Where was all the green? Where was the sunshine? Where were all the temples? Why weren’t we profusely sweating? We had just spent five months living in paradise after paradise and even when we were in big, dirty cities they were still vibrant and full of colorful life. So much for the non-attachment theory. :) Chicago in March is the pits.
We made it to Molly’s Home-Away-From-Home Retreat, I dropped my bags and immediately drew a bath. It had been five months since I soaked in a tub and let me tell you, it was magical with bath bubbles and all. Ahhhh. And then I got out and covered myself with a towel. Doesn’t sound that great, but this towel was amazing! It covered more than 1/4 of my body and was so fluffy. After attempting to cover up with teeny tiny towels for months, I forgot what towels felt like here. I used my phone to call my mom (actually made a call without using Skype) and to text my sibs (actually texted without using WhatsApp). I forgot 3G existed and became so confused to the fact that I could use the map application, send email and google something on-the-go without a wifi connection. I used a computer for the first time since we left. During our trip I wrote all blog posts, took all pics and researched and booked everything on my iPhone 4. After months of nothing but my phone, I can honestly say for the most part that the mobile web and many mobile apps are complete and utter $hit. There’s a lot of work to be done. To all my fellow user experience and content strategy coworkers, keep surging forward. I made my phone work for five months, but there were several frustrating moments. With these simple forgotten pleasures and some technology, my mood was starting to transform and America was looking up already. Now, it was time for the store. We bundled up with whatever we could and headed out for a brisk walk to Marianos market to pick up a few items for dinner. Fortunately for me, Molly has several winter coats and warm-weather gear. American grocery stores are unbelievable! They’re convenient, have massively wide aisles and whole sections dedicated to cheese. Our trip to the store proved to be overwhelming, exhilarating and expensive. 6:00 PM comes around and we could no longer keep our eyes open. 14-hour time difference got the best of us and we were out.
After two days of an unsuccessful apartment hunt in Chicago, we just weren’t feeling it and drove off to Akron, Ohio to visit my family. A quick, 6-hour drive and then we were greeted with smiling faces, hugs, kisses, gifts and a ridiculous amount of homemade food. My mom and Grandma Johnson put out a spread of homemade lasagna, a fabulous cheese plate, appetizers and chocolate-covered strawberries. Yep, America was still on the up and up!
We spent a week at my parents snuggling with my fam, eating homemade meals (my mom even made pho) and visiting some of my favorite restaurants, e.g. Parisson’s, The Barn, El Rincon and Pav’s for ice cream. Resting and stuffing our faces was just what we needed! We saw my cancer-free brother, Scotty, for the first time since his NHL was declared in remission. We got to spend my brother, Joey’s, 35th birthday with him. I got to catch up with some old friends. And, I turned my parents living room into a mini yoga studio and practiced teaching yoga nearly every day to Adrian and my family (including my 75 year old grandma). Thank you all for being so cooperative and supportive. I even taught my first yoga class on my own to 26 students at the Portage Lakes Fitness Center. The fitness center was my first job when I was 16 (now my baby sis works there) and the place where I took my very first yoga class many years ago. I was stoked and nervous to teach there, but it went really well.
Our week in Akron flew by. We had a fabulous time. There’s no place like home, but us gypsies are on the move. With homemade granola from mamma, brownies from Grandma Bobbie and plenty of other snacks, we headed out for an 18-hour drive to Florida. First stop: Lithia to visit Adrian’s family. Then off to Clearwater, Tampa and Bradenton to visit friends. We can’t wait to see all of our FL peeps, eat Puerto Rican and Cuban food and get back to some sunshine! We flew into Chicago from Bali after layovers in Hong Kong and LA. Cold temps, snow and a storage unit covered in ice awaited us. I only shed a couple tears at the airport and quickly recovered from a would-have-been meltdown. Nope, no meltdowns here! I was practicing non-attachment. Something I read about in the Yoga Sutras and discussed in my yoga course. I was not going to attach myself and hold on to this experience as it was coming to an end. I didn’t want this incredible trip to turn into pain, because we wouldn’t be traveling there anymore. We did the damn thing, we lived it to the fullest and we will never forget. But, instead of longing for it when it was over, I would keep the memories in my heart and then let it go. After all, there will be more traveling in the future. We’re already thinking about South America next winter. :) And, we’ve got work to do. Big, exciting changes ahead for Adrian and me. For now, we will focus on the present and see what happens. Bit by bit.
Nearly 40 hours of travel and we were hit smack in the face with the aftermath of the polar vortex. Adrian’s friend, Patrick, picked us up from the airport and helped us shovel out the snow in front of our storage unit. We opened the door and there sat Adrian’s car and our mound of sh!t-we-don’t-need sitting atop two inches of ice. Adrian’s car managed to start up no problem (Honda’s rock)! We grabbed small suitcases filled with some warmer clothing, because flip flops and light sweaters weren’t cutting it. Too bad our clothes were frozen solid in our suitcases.
Our friend, Molly, the one that spent a couple weeks with us in Thailand, graciously let us stay at her apartment for a few nights while she was becoming famous and giving speeches on mobile marketing at the SXSW festival in Austin, TX. As we drove to Molly’s to thaw out, I was shocked at the eyesore that is Chicago winter. Everything is dead. Bare trees, grey slush from halfway melted snow and no wildlife in site. Where was all the green? Where was the sunshine? Where were all the temples? Why weren’t we profusely sweating? We had just spent five months living in paradise after paradise and even when we were in big, dirty cities they were still vibrant and full of colorful life. So much for the non-attachment theory. :) Chicago in March is the pits.
We made it to Molly’s Home-Away-From-Home Retreat, I dropped my bags and immediately drew a bath. It had been five months since I soaked in a tub and let me tell you, it was magical with bath bubbles and all. Ahhhh. And then I got out and covered myself with a towel. Doesn’t sound that great, but this towel was amazing! It covered more than 1/4 of my body and was so fluffy. After attempting to cover up with teeny tiny towels for months, I forgot what towels felt like here. I used my phone to call my mom (actually made a call without using Skype) and to text my sibs (actually texted without using WhatsApp). I forgot 3G existed and became so confused to the fact that I could use the map application, send email and google something on-the-go without a wifi connection. I used a computer for the first time since we left. During our trip I wrote all blog posts, took all pics and researched and booked everything on my iPhone 4. After months of nothing but my phone, I can honestly say for the most part that the mobile web and many mobile apps are complete and utter $hit. There’s a lot of work to be done. To all my fellow user experience and content strategy coworkers, keep surging forward. I made my phone work for five months, but there were several frustrating moments. With these simple forgotten pleasures and some technology, my mood was starting to transform and America was looking up already. Now, it was time for the store. We bundled up with whatever we could and headed out for a brisk walk to Marianos market to pick up a few items for dinner. Fortunately for me, Molly has several winter coats and warm-weather gear. American grocery stores are unbelievable! They’re convenient, have massively wide aisles and whole sections dedicated to cheese. Our trip to the store proved to be overwhelming, exhilarating and expensive. 6:00 PM comes around and we could no longer keep our eyes open. 14-hour time difference got the best of us and we were out.
After two days of an unsuccessful apartment hunt in Chicago, we just weren’t feeling it and drove off to Akron, Ohio to visit my family. A quick, 6-hour drive and then we were greeted with smiling faces, hugs, kisses, gifts and a ridiculous amount of homemade food. My mom and Grandma Johnson put out a spread of homemade lasagna, a fabulous cheese plate, appetizers and chocolate-covered strawberries. Yep, America was still on the up and up!
We spent a week at my parents snuggling with my fam, eating homemade meals (my mom even made pho) and visiting some of my favorite restaurants, e.g. Parisson’s, The Barn, El Rincon and Pav’s for ice cream. Resting and stuffing our faces was just what we needed! We saw my cancer-free brother, Scotty, for the first time since his NHL was declared in remission. We got to spend my brother, Joey’s, 35th birthday with him. I got to catch up with some old friends. And, I turned my parents living room into a mini yoga studio and practiced teaching yoga nearly every day to Adrian and my family (including my 75 year old grandma). Thank you all for being so cooperative and supportive. I even taught my first yoga class on my own to 26 students at the Portage Lakes Fitness Center. The fitness center was my first job when I was 16 (now my baby sis works there) and the place where I took my very first yoga class many years ago. I was stoked and nervous to teach there, but it went really well.
Our week in Akron flew by. We had a fabulous time. There’s no place like home, but us gypsies are on the move. With homemade granola from mamma, brownies from Grandma Bobbie and plenty of other snacks, we headed out for an 18-hour drive to Florida. First stop: Lithia to visit Adrian’s family. Then off to Clearwater, Tampa and Bradenton to visit friends. We can’t wait to see all of our FL peeps, eat Puerto Rican and Cuban food and get back to some sunshine! We flew into Chicago from Bali after layovers in Hong Kong and LA. Cold temps, snow and a storage unit covered in ice awaited us. I only shed a couple tears at the airport and quickly recovered from a would-have-been meltdown. Nope, no meltdowns here! I was practicing non-attachment. Something I read about in the Yoga Sutras and discussed in my yoga course. I was not going to attach myself and hold on to this experience as it was coming to an end. I didn’t want this incredible trip to turn into pain, because we wouldn’t be traveling there anymore. We did the damn thing, we lived it to the fullest and we will never forget. But, instead of longing for it when it was over, I would keep the memories in my heart and then let it go. After all, there will be more traveling in the future. We’re already thinking about South America next winter. :) And, we’ve got work to do. Big, exciting changes ahead for Adrian and me. For now, we will focus on the present and see what happens. Bit by bit.
Nearly 40 hours of travel and we were hit smack in the face with the aftermath of the polar vortex. Adrian’s friend, Patrick, picked us up from the airport and helped us shovel out the snow in front of our storage unit. We opened the door and there sat Adrian’s car and our mound of sh!t-we-don’t-need sitting atop two inches of ice. Adrian’s car managed to start up no problem (Honda’s rock)! We grabbed small suitcases filled with some warmer clothing, because flip flops and light sweaters weren’t cutting it. Too bad our clothes were frozen solid in our suitcases.
Our friend, Molly, the one that spent a couple weeks with us in Thailand, graciously let us stay at her apartment for a few nights while she was becoming famous and giving speeches on mobile marketing at the SXSW festival in Austin, TX. As we drove to Molly’s to thaw out, I was shocked at the eyesore that is Chicago winter. Everything is dead. Bare trees, grey slush from halfway melted snow and no wildlife in site. Where was all the green? Where was the sunshine? Where were all the temples? Why weren’t we profusely sweating? We had just spent five months living in paradise after paradise and even when we were in big, dirty cities they were still vibrant and full of colorful life. So much for the non-attachment theory. :) Chicago in March is the pits.
We made it to Molly’s Home-Away-From-Home Retreat, I dropped my bags and immediately drew a bath. It had been five months since I soaked in a tub and let me tell you, it was magical with bath bubbles and all. Ahhhh. And then I got out and covered myself with a towel. Doesn’t sound that great, but this towel was amazing! It covered more than 1/4 of my body and was so fluffy. After attempting to cover up with teeny tiny towels for months, I forgot what towels felt like here. I used my phone to call my mom (actually made a call without using Skype) and to text my sibs (actually texted without using WhatsApp). I forgot 3G existed and became so confused to the fact that I could use the map application, send email and google something on-the-go without a wifi connection. I used a computer for the first time since we left. During our trip I wrote all blog posts, took all pics and researched and booked everything on my iPhone 4. After months of nothing but my phone, I can honestly say for the most part that the mobile web and many mobile apps are complete and utter $hit. There’s a lot of work to be done. To all my fellow user experience and content strategy coworkers, keep surging forward. I made my phone work for five months, but there were several frustrating moments. With these simple forgotten pleasures and some technology, my mood was starting to transform and America was looking up already. Now, it was time for the store. We bundled up with whatever we could and headed out for a brisk walk to Marianos market to pick up a few items for dinner. Fortunately for me, Molly has several winter coats and warm-weather gear. American grocery stores are unbelievable! They’re convenient, have massively wide aisles and whole sections dedicated to cheese. Our trip to the store proved to be overwhelming, exhilarating and expensive. 6:00 PM comes around and we could no longer keep our eyes open. 14-hour time difference got the best of us and we were out.
After two days of an unsuccessful apartment hunt in Chicago, we just weren’t feeling it and drove off to Akron, Ohio to visit my family. A quick, 6-hour drive and then we were greeted with smiling faces, hugs, kisses, gifts and a ridiculous amount of homemade food. My mom and Grandma Johnson put out a spread of homemade lasagna, a fabulous cheese plate, appetizers and chocolate-covered strawberries. Yep, America was still on the up and up!
We spent a week at my parents snuggling with my fam, eating homemade meals (my mom even made pho) and visiting some of my favorite restaurants, e.g. Parisson’s, The Barn, El Rincon and Pav’s for ice cream. Resting and stuffing our faces was just what we needed! We saw my cancer-free brother, Scotty, for the first time since his NHL was declared in remission. We got to spend my brother, Joey’s, 35th birthday with him. I got to catch up with some old friends. And, I turned my parents living room into a mini yoga studio and practiced teaching yoga nearly every day to Adrian and my family (including my 75 year old grandma). Thank you all for being so cooperative and supportive. I even taught my first yoga class on my own to 26 students at the Portage Lakes Fitness Center. The fitness center was my first job when I was 16 (now my baby sis works there) and the place where I took my very first yoga class many years ago. I was stoked and nervous to teach there, but it went really well.
Our week in Akron flew by. We had a fabulous time. There’s no place like home, but us gypsies are on the move. With homemade granola from mamma, brownies from Grandma Bobbie and plenty of other snacks, we headed out for an 18-hour drive to Florida. First stop: Lithia to visit Adrian’s family. Then off to Clearwater, Tampa and Bradenton to visit friends. We can’t wait to see all of our FL peeps, eat Puerto Rican and Cuban food and get back to some sunshine! We flew into Chicago from Bali after layovers in Hong Kong and LA. Cold temps, snow and a storage unit covered in ice awaited us. I only shed a couple tears at the airport and quickly recovered from a would-have-been meltdown. Nope, no meltdowns here! I was practicing non-attachment. Something I read about in the Yoga Sutras and discussed in my yoga course. I was not going to attach myself and hold on to this experience as it was coming to an end. I didn’t want this incredible trip to turn into pain, because we wouldn’t be traveling there anymore. We did the damn thing, we lived it to the fullest and we will never forget. But, instead of longing for it when it was over, I would keep the memories in my heart and then let it go. After all, there will be more traveling in the future. We’re already thinking about South America next winter. :) And, we’ve got work to do. Big, exciting changes ahead for Adrian and me. For now, we will focus on the present and see what happens. Bit by bit.
Nearly 40 hours of travel and we were hit smack in the face with the aftermath of the polar vortex. Adrian’s friend, Patrick, picked us up from the airport and helped us shovel out the snow in front of our storage unit. We opened the door and there sat Adrian’s car and our mound of sh!t-we-don’t-need sitting atop two inches of ice. Adrian’s car managed to start up no problem (Honda’s rock)! We grabbed small suitcases filled with some warmer clothing, because flip flops and light sweaters weren’t cutting it. Too bad our clothes were frozen solid in our suitcases.
Our friend, Molly, the one that spent a couple weeks with us in Thailand, graciously let us stay at her apartment for a few nights while she was becoming famous and giving speeches on mobile marketing at the SXSW festival in Austin, TX. As we drove to Molly’s to thaw out, I was shocked at the eyesore that is Chicago winter. Everything is dead. Bare trees, grey slush from halfway melted snow and no wildlife in site. Where was all the green? Where was the sunshine? Where were all the temples? Why weren’t we profusely sweating? We had just spent five months living in paradise after paradise and even when we were in big, dirty cities they were still vibrant and full of colorful life. So much for the non-attachment theory. :) Chicago in March is the pits.
We made it to Molly’s Home-Away-From-Home Retreat, I dropped my bags and immediately drew a bath. It had been five months since I soaked in a tub and let me tell you, it was magical with bath bubbles and all. Ahhhh. And then I got out and covered myself with a towel. Doesn’t sound that great, but this towel was amazing! It covered more than 1/4 of my body and was so fluffy. After attempting to cover up with teeny tiny towels for months, I forgot what towels felt like here. I used my phone to call my mom (actually made a call without using Skype) and to text my sibs (actually texted without using WhatsApp). I forgot 3G existed and became so confused to the fact that I could use the map application, send email and google something on-the-go without a wifi connection. I used a computer for the first time since we left. During our trip I wrote all blog posts, took all pics and researched and booked everything on my iPhone 4. After months of nothing but my phone, I can honestly say for the most part that the mobile web and many mobile apps are complete and utter $hit. There’s a lot of work to be done. To all my fellow user experience and content strategy coworkers, keep surging forward. I made my phone work for five months, but there were several frustrating moments. With these simple forgotten pleasures and some technology, my mood was starting to transform and America was looking up already. Now, it was time for the store. We bundled up with whatever we could and headed out for a brisk walk to Marianos market to pick up a few items for dinner. Fortunately for me, Molly has several winter coats and warm-weather gear. American grocery stores are unbelievable! They’re convenient, have massively wide aisles and whole sections dedicated to cheese. Our trip to the store proved to be overwhelming, exhilarating and expensive. 6:00 PM comes around and we could no longer keep our eyes open. 14-hour time difference got the best of us and we were out.
After two days of an unsuccessful apartment hunt in Chicago, we just weren’t feeling it and drove off to Akron, Ohio to visit my family. A quick, 6-hour drive and then we were greeted with smiling faces, hugs, kisses, gifts and a ridiculous amount of homemade food. My mom and Grandma Johnson put out a spread of homemade lasagna, a fabulous cheese plate, appetizers and chocolate-covered strawberries. Yep, America was still on the up and up!
We spent a week at my parents snuggling with my fam, eating homemade meals (my mom even made pho) and visiting some of my favorite restaurants, e.g. Parisson’s, The Barn, El Rincon and Pav’s for ice cream. Resting and stuffing our faces was just what we needed! We saw my cancer-free brother, Scotty, for the first time since his NHL was declared in remission. We got to spend my brother, Joey’s, 35th birthday with him. I got to catch up with some old friends. And, I turned my parents living room into a mini yoga studio and practiced teaching yoga nearly every day to Adrian and my family (including my 75 year old grandma). Thank you all for being so cooperative and supportive. I even taught my first yoga class on my own to 26 students at the Portage Lakes Fitness Center. The fitness center was my first job when I was 16 (now my baby sis works there) and the place where I took my very first yoga class many years ago. I was stoked and nervous to teach there, but it went really well.
Our week in Akron flew by. We had a fabulous time. There’s no place like home, but us gypsies are on the move. With homemade granola from mamma, brownies from Grandma Bobbie and plenty of other snacks, we headed out for an 18-hour drive to Florida. First stop: Lithia to visit Adrian’s family. Then off to Clearwater, Tampa and Bradenton to visit friends. We can’t wait to see all of our FL peeps, eat Puerto Rican and Cuban food and get back to some sunshine! We flew into Chicago from Bali after layovers in Hong Kong and LA. Cold temps, snow and a storage unit covered in ice awaited us. I only shed a couple tears at the airport and quickly recovered from a would-have-been meltdown. Nope, no meltdowns here! I was practicing non-attachment. Something I read about in the Yoga Sutras and discussed in my yoga course. I was not going to attach myself and hold on to this experience as it was coming to an end. I didn’t want this incredible trip to turn into pain, because we wouldn’t be traveling there anymore. We did the damn thing, we lived it to the fullest and we will never forget. But, instead of longing for it when it was over, I would keep the memories in my heart and then let it go. After all, there will be more traveling in the future. We’re already thinking about South America next winter. :) And, we’ve got work to do. Big, exciting changes ahead for Adrian and me. For now, we will focus on the present and see what happens. Bit by bit.
Nearly 40 hours of travel and we were hit smack in the face with the aftermath of the polar vortex. Adrian’s friend, Patrick, picked us up from the airport and helped us shovel out the snow in front of our storage unit. We opened the door and there sat Adrian’s car and our mound of sh!t-we-don’t-need sitting atop two inches of ice. Adrian’s car managed to start up no problem (Honda’s rock)! We grabbed small suitcases filled with some warmer clothing, because flip flops and light sweaters weren’t cutting it. Too bad our clothes were frozen solid in our suitcases.
Our friend, Molly, the one that spent a couple weeks with us in Thailand, graciously let us stay at her apartment for a few nights while she was becoming famous and giving speeches on mobile marketing at the SXSW festival in Austin, TX. As we drove to Molly’s to thaw out, I was shocked at the eyesore that is Chicago winter. Everything is dead. Bare trees, grey slush from halfway melted snow and no wildlife in site. Where was all the green? Where was the sunshine? Where were all the temples? Why weren’t we profusely sweating? We had just spent five months living in paradise after paradise and even when we were in big, dirty cities they were still vibrant and full of colorful life. So much for the non-attachment theory. :) Chicago in March is the pits.
We made it to Molly’s Home-Away-From-Home Retreat, I dropped my bags and immediately drew a bath. It had been five months since I soaked in a tub and let me tell you, it was magical with bath bubbles and all. Ahhhh. And then I got out and covered myself with a towel. Doesn’t sound that great, but this towel was amazing! It covered more than 1/4 of my body and was so fluffy. After attempting to cover up with teeny tiny towels for months, I forgot what towels felt like here. I used my phone to call my mom (actually made a call without using Skype) and to text my sibs (actually texted without using WhatsApp). I forgot 3G existed and became so confused to the fact that I could use the map application, send email and google something on-the-go without a wifi connection. I used a computer for the first time since we left. During our trip I wrote all blog posts, took all pics and researched and booked everything on my iPhone 4. After months of nothing but my phone, I can honestly say for the most part that the mobile web and many mobile apps are complete and utter $hit. There’s a lot of work to be done. To all my fellow user experience and content strategy coworkers, keep surging forward. I made my phone work for five months, but there were several frustrating moments. With these simple forgotten pleasures and some technology, my mood was starting to transform and America was looking up already. Now, it was time for the store. We bundled up with whatever we could and headed out for a brisk walk to Marianos market to pick up a few items for dinner. Fortunately for me, Molly has several winter coats and warm-weather gear. American grocery stores are unbelievable! They’re convenient, have massively wide aisles and whole sections dedicated to cheese. Our trip to the store proved to be overwhelming, exhilarating and expensive. 6:00 PM comes around and we could no longer keep our eyes open. 14-hour time difference got the best of us and we were out.
After two days of an unsuccessful apartment hunt in Chicago, we just weren’t feeling it and drove off to Akron, Ohio to visit my family. A quick, 6-hour drive and then we were greeted with smiling faces, hugs, kisses, gifts and a ridiculous amount of homemade food. My mom and Grandma Johnson put out a spread of homemade lasagna, a fabulous cheese plate, appetizers and chocolate-covered strawberries. Yep, America was still on the up and up!
We spent a week at my parents snuggling with my fam, eating homemade meals (my mom even made pho) and visiting some of my favorite restaurants, e.g. Parisson’s, The Barn, El Rincon and Pav’s for ice cream. Resting and stuffing our faces was just what we needed! We saw my cancer-free brother, Scotty, for the first time since his NHL was declared in remission. We got to spend my brother, Joey’s, 35th birthday with him. I got to catch up with some old friends. And, I turned my parents living room into a mini yoga studio and practiced teaching yoga nearly every day to Adrian and my family (including my 75 year old grandma). Thank you all for being so cooperative and supportive. I even taught my first yoga class on my own to 26 students at the Portage Lakes Fitness Center. The fitness center was my first job when I was 16 (now my baby sis works there) and the place where I took my very first yoga class many years ago. I was stoked and nervous to teach there, but it went really well.
Our week in Akron flew by. We had a fabulous time. There’s no place like home, but us gypsies are on the move. With homemade granola from mamma, brownies from Grandma Bobbie and plenty of other snacks, we headed out for an 18-hour drive to Florida. First stop: Lithia to visit Adrian’s family. Then off to Clearwater, Tampa and Bradenton to visit friends. We can’t wait to see all of our FL peeps, eat Puerto Rican and Cuban food and get back to some sunshine! We flew into Chicago from Bali after layovers in Hong Kong and LA. Cold temps, snow and a storage unit covered in ice awaited us. I only shed a couple tears at the airport and quickly recovered from a would-have-been meltdown. Nope, no meltdowns here! I was practicing non-attachment. Something I read about in the Yoga Sutras and discussed in my yoga course. I was not going to attach myself and hold on to this experience as it was coming to an end. I didn’t want this incredible trip to turn into pain, because we wouldn’t be traveling there anymore. We did the damn thing, we lived it to the fullest and we will never forget. But, instead of longing for it when it was over, I would keep the memories in my heart and then let it go. After all, there will be more traveling in the future. We’re already thinking about South America next winter. :) And, we’ve got work to do. Big, exciting changes ahead for Adrian and me. For now, we will focus on the present and see what happens. Bit by bit.
Nearly 40 hours of travel and we were hit smack in the face with the aftermath of the polar vortex. Adrian’s friend, Patrick, picked us up from the airport and helped us shovel out the snow in front of our storage unit. We opened the door and there sat Adrian’s car and our mound of sh!t-we-don’t-need sitting atop two inches of ice. Adrian’s car managed to start up no problem (Honda’s rock)! We grabbed small suitcases filled with some warmer clothing, because flip flops and light sweaters weren’t cutting it. Too bad our clothes were frozen solid in our suitcases.
Our friend, Molly, the one that spent a couple weeks with us in Thailand, graciously let us stay at her apartment for a few nights while she was becoming famous and giving speeches on mobile marketing at the SXSW festival in Austin, TX. As we drove to Molly’s to thaw out, I was shocked at the eyesore that is Chicago winter. Everything is dead. Bare trees, grey slush from halfway melted snow and no wildlife in site. Where was all the green? Where was the sunshine? Where were all the temples? Why weren’t we profusely sweating? We had just spent five months living in paradise after paradise and even when we were in big, dirty cities they were still vibrant and full of colorful life. So much for the non-attachment theory. :) Chicago in March is the pits.
We made it to Molly’s Home-Away-From-Home Retreat, I dropped my bags and immediately drew a bath. It had been five months since I soaked in a tub and let me tell you, it was magical with bath bubbles and all. Ahhhh. And then I got out and covered myself with a towel. Doesn’t sound that great, but this towel was amazing! It covered more than 1/4 of my body and was so fluffy. After attempting to cover up with teeny tiny towels for months, I forgot what towels felt like here. I used my phone to call my mom (actually made a call without using Skype) and to text my sibs (actually texted without using WhatsApp). I forgot 3G existed and became so confused to the fact that I could use the map application, send email and google something on-the-go without a wifi connection. I used a computer for the first time since we left. During our trip I wrote all blog posts, took all pics and researched and booked everything on my iPhone 4. After months of nothing but my phone, I can honestly say for the most part that the mobile web and many mobile apps are complete and utter $hit. There’s a lot of work to be done. To all my fellow user experience and content strategy coworkers, keep surging forward. I made my phone work for five months, but there were several frustrating moments. With these simple forgotten pleasures and some technology, my mood was starting to transform and America was looking up already. Now, it was time for the store. We bundled up with whatever we could and headed out for a brisk walk to Marianos market to pick up a few items for dinner. Fortunately for me, Molly has several winter coats and warm-weather gear. American grocery stores are unbelievable! They’re convenient, have massively wide aisles and whole sections dedicated to cheese. Our trip to the store proved to be overwhelming, exhilarating and expensive. 6:00 PM comes around and we could no longer keep our eyes open. 14-hour time difference got the best of us and we were out.
After two days of an unsuccessful apartment hunt in Chicago, we just weren’t feeling it and drove off to Akron, Ohio to visit my family. A quick, 6-hour drive and then we were greeted with smiling faces, hugs, kisses, gifts and a ridiculous amount of homemade food. My mom and Grandma Johnson put out a spread of homemade lasagna, a fabulous cheese plate, appetizers and chocolate-covered strawberries. Yep, America was still on the up and up!
We spent a week at my parents snuggling with my fam, eating homemade meals (my mom even made pho) and visiting some of my favorite restaurants, e.g. Parisson’s, The Barn, El Rincon and Pav’s for ice cream. Resting and stuffing our faces was just what we needed! We saw my cancer-free brother, Scotty, for the first time since his NHL was declared in remission. We got to spend my brother, Joey’s, 35th birthday with him. I got to catch up with some old friends. And, I turned my parents living room into a mini yoga studio and practiced teaching yoga nearly every day to Adrian and my family (including my 75 year old grandma). Thank you all for being so cooperative and supportive. I even taught my first yoga class on my own to 26 students at the Portage Lakes Fitness Center. The fitness center was my first job when I was 16 (now my baby sis works there) and the place where I took my very first yoga class many years ago. I was stoked and nervous to teach there, but it went really well.
Our week in Akron flew by. We had a fabulous time. There’s no place like home, but us gypsies are on the move. With homemade granola from mamma, brownies from Grandma Bobbie and plenty of other snacks, we headed out for an 18-hour drive to Florida. First stop: Lithia to visit Adrian’s family. Then off to Clearwater, Tampa and Bradenton to visit friends. We can’t wait to see all of our FL peeps, eat Puerto Rican and Cuban food and get back to some sunshine! We flew into Chicago from Bali after layovers in Hong Kong and LA. Cold temps, snow and a storage unit covered in ice awaited us. I only shed a couple tears at the airport and quickly recovered from a would-have-been meltdown. Nope, no meltdowns here! I was practicing non-attachment. Something I read about in the Yoga Sutras and discussed in my yoga course. I was not going to attach myself and hold on to this experience as it was coming to an end. I didn’t want this incredible trip to turn into pain, because we wouldn’t be traveling there anymore. We did the damn thing, we lived it to the fullest and we will never forget. But, instead of longing for it when it was over, I would keep the memories in my heart and then let it go. After all, there will be more traveling in the future. We’re already thinking about South America next winter. :) And, we’ve got work to do. Big, exciting changes ahead for Adrian and me. For now, we will focus on the present and see what happens. Bit by bit.
Nearly 40 hours of travel and we were hit smack in the face with the aftermath of the polar vortex. Adrian’s friend, Patrick, picked us up from the airport and helped us shovel out the snow in front of our storage unit. We opened the door and there sat Adrian’s car and our mound of sh!t-we-don’t-need sitting atop two inches of ice. Adrian’s car managed to start up no problem (Honda’s rock)! We grabbed small suitcases filled with some warmer clothing, because flip flops and light sweaters weren’t cutting it. Too bad our clothes were frozen solid in our suitcases.
Our friend, Molly, the one that spent a couple weeks with us in Thailand, graciously let us stay at her apartment for a few nights while she was becoming famous and giving speeches on mobile marketing at the SXSW festival in Austin, TX. As we drove to Molly’s to thaw out, I was shocked at the eyesore that is Chicago winter. Everything is dead. Bare trees, grey slush from halfway melted snow and no wildlife in site. Where was all the green? Where was the sunshine? Where were all the temples? Why weren’t we profusely sweating? We had just spent five months living in paradise after paradise and even when we were in big, dirty cities they were still vibrant and full of colorful life. So much for the non-attachment theory. :) Chicago in March is the pits.
We made it to Molly’s Home-Away-From-Home Retreat, I dropped my bags and immediately drew a bath. It had been five months since I soaked in a tub and let me tell you, it was magical with bath bubbles and all. Ahhhh. And then I got out and covered myself with a towel. Doesn’t sound that great, but this towel was amazing! It covered more than 1/4 of my body and was so fluffy. After attempting to cover up with teeny tiny towels for months, I forgot what towels felt like here. I used my phone to call my mom (actually made a call without using Skype) and to text my sibs (actually texted without using WhatsApp). I forgot 3G existed and became so confused to the fact that I could use the map application, send email and google something on-the-go without a wifi connection. I used a computer for the first time since we left. During our trip I wrote all blog posts, took all pics and researched and booked everything on my iPhone 4. After months of nothing but my phone, I can honestly say for the most part that the mobile web and many mobile apps are complete and utter $hit. There’s a lot of work to be done. To all my fellow user experience and content strategy coworkers, keep surging forward. I made my phone work for five months, but there were several frustrating moments. With these simple forgotten pleasures and some technology, my mood was starting to transform and America was looking up already. Now, it was time for the store. We bundled up with whatever we could and headed out for a brisk walk to Marianos market to pick up a few items for dinner. Fortunately for me, Molly has several winter coats and warm-weather gear. American grocery stores are unbelievable! They’re convenient, have massively wide aisles and whole sections dedicated to cheese. Our trip to the store proved to be overwhelming, exhilarating and expensive. 6:00 PM comes around and we could no longer keep our eyes open. 14-hour time difference got the best of us and we were out.
After two days of an unsuccessful apartment hunt in Chicago, we just weren’t feeling it and drove off to Akron, Ohio to visit my family. A quick, 6-hour drive and then we were greeted with smiling faces, hugs, kisses, gifts and a ridiculous amount of homemade food. My mom and Grandma Johnson put out a spread of homemade lasagna, a fabulous cheese plate, appetizers and chocolate-covered strawberries. Yep, America was still on the up and up!
We spent a week at my parents snuggling with my fam, eating homemade meals (my mom even made pho) and visiting some of my favorite restaurants, e.g. Parisson’s, The Barn, El Rincon and Pav’s for ice cream. Resting and stuffing our faces was just what we needed! We saw my cancer-free brother, Scotty, for the first time since his NHL was declared in remission. We got to spend my brother, Joey’s, 35th birthday with him. I got to catch up with some old friends. And, I turned my parents living room into a mini yoga studio and practiced teaching yoga nearly every day to Adrian and my family (including my 75 year old grandma). Thank you all for being so cooperative and supportive. I even taught my first yoga class on my own to 26 students at the Portage Lakes Fitness Center. The fitness center was my first job when I was 16 (now my baby sis works there) and the place where I took my very first yoga class many years ago. I was stoked and nervous to teach there, but it went really well.
Our week in Akron flew by. We had a fabulous time. There’s no place like home, but us gypsies are on the move. With homemade granola from mamma, brownies from Grandma Bobbie and plenty of other snacks, we headed out for an 18-hour drive to Florida. First stop: Lithia to visit Adrian’s family. Then off to Clearwater, Tampa and Bradenton to visit friends. We can’t wait to see all of our FL peeps, eat Puerto Rican and Cuban food and get back to some sunshine! We flew into Chicago from Bali after layovers in Hong Kong and LA. Cold temps, snow and a storage unit covered in ice awaited us. I only shed a couple tears at the airport and quickly recovered from a would-have-been meltdown. Nope, no meltdowns here! I was practicing non-attachment. Something I read about in the Yoga Sutras and discussed in my yoga course. I was not going to attach myself and hold on to this experience as it was coming to an end. I didn’t want this incredible trip to turn into pain, because we wouldn’t be traveling there anymore. We did the damn thing, we lived it to the fullest and we will never forget. But, instead of longing for it when it was over, I would keep the memories in my heart and then let it go. After all, there will be more traveling in the future. We’re already thinking about South America next winter. :) And, we’ve got work to do. Big, exciting changes ahead for Adrian and me. For now, we will focus on the present and see what happens. Bit by bit.
Nearly 40 hours of travel and we were hit smack in the face with the aftermath of the polar vortex. Adrian’s friend, Patrick, picked us up from the airport and helped us shovel out the snow in front of our storage unit. We opened the door and there sat Adrian’s car and our mound of sh!t-we-don’t-need sitting atop two inches of ice. Adrian’s car managed to start up no problem (Honda’s rock)! We grabbed small suitcases filled with some warmer clothing, because flip flops and light sweaters weren’t cutting it. Too bad our clothes were frozen solid in our suitcases.
Our friend, Molly, the one that spent a couple weeks with us in Thailand, graciously let us stay at her apartment for a few nights while she was becoming famous and giving speeches on mobile marketing at the SXSW festival in Austin, TX. As we drove to Molly’s to thaw out, I was shocked at the eyesore that is Chicago winter. Everything is dead. Bare trees, grey slush from halfway melted snow and no wildlife in site. Where was all the green? Where was the sunshine? Where were all the temples? Why weren’t we profusely sweating? We had just spent five months living in paradise after paradise and even when we were in big, dirty cities they were still vibrant and full of colorful life. So much for the non-attachment theory. :) Chicago in March is the pits.
We made it to Molly’s Home-Away-From-Home Retreat, I dropped my bags and immediately drew a bath. It had been five months since I soaked in a tub and let me tell you, it was magical with bath bubbles and all. Ahhhh. And then I got out and covered myself with a towel. Doesn’t sound that great, but this towel was amazing! It covered more than 1/4 of my body and was so fluffy. After attempting to cover up with teeny tiny towels for months, I forgot what towels felt like here. I used my phone to call my mom (actually made a call without using Skype) and to text my sibs (actually texted without using WhatsApp). I forgot 3G existed and became so confused to the fact that I could use the map application, send email and google something on-the-go without a wifi connection. I used a computer for the first time since we left. During our trip I wrote all blog posts, took all pics and researched and booked everything on my iPhone 4. After months of nothing but my phone, I can honestly say for the most part that the mobile web and many mobile apps are complete and utter $hit. There’s a lot of work to be done. To all my fellow user experience and content strategy coworkers, keep surging forward. I made my phone work for five months, but there were several frustrating moments. With these simple forgotten pleasures and some technology, my mood was starting to transform and America was looking up already. Now, it was time for the store. We bundled up with whatever we could and headed out for a brisk walk to Marianos market to pick up a few items for dinner. Fortunately for me, Molly has several winter coats and warm-weather gear. American grocery stores are unbelievable! They’re convenient, have massively wide aisles and whole sections dedicated to cheese. Our trip to the store proved to be overwhelming, exhilarating and expensive. 6:00 PM comes around and we could no longer keep our eyes open. 14-hour time difference got the best of us and we were out.
After two days of an unsuccessful apartment hunt in Chicago, we just weren’t feeling it and drove off to Akron, Ohio to visit my family. A quick, 6-hour drive and then we were greeted with smiling faces, hugs, kisses, gifts and a ridiculous amount of homemade food. My mom and Grandma Johnson put out a spread of homemade lasagna, a fabulous cheese plate, appetizers and chocolate-covered strawberries. Yep, America was still on the up and up!
We spent a week at my parents snuggling with my fam, eating homemade meals (my mom even made pho) and visiting some of my favorite restaurants, e.g. Parisson’s, The Barn, El Rincon and Pav’s for ice cream. Resting and stuffing our faces was just what we needed! We saw my cancer-free brother, Scotty, for the first time since his NHL was declared in remission. We got to spend my brother, Joey’s, 35th birthday with him. I got to catch up with some old friends. And, I turned my parents living room into a mini yoga studio and practiced teaching yoga nearly every day to Adrian and my family (including my 75 year old grandma). Thank you all for being so cooperative and supportive. I even taught my first yoga class on my own to 26 students at the Portage Lakes Fitness Center. The fitness center was my first job when I was 16 (now my baby sis works there) and the place where I took my very first yoga class many years ago. I was stoked and nervous to teach there, but it went really well.
Our week in Akron flew by. We had a fabulous time. There’s no place like home, but us gypsies are on the move. With homemade granola from mamma, brownies from Grandma Bobbie and plenty of other snacks, we headed out for an 18-hour drive to Florida. First stop: Lithia to visit Adrian’s family. Then off to Clearwater, Tampa and Bradenton to visit friends. We can’t wait to see all of our FL peeps, eat Puerto Rican and Cuban food and get back to some sunshine! We flew into Chicago from Bali after layovers in Hong Kong and LA. Cold temps, snow and a storage unit covered in ice awaited us. I only shed a couple tears at the airport and quickly recovered from a would-have-been meltdown. Nope, no meltdowns here! I was practicing non-attachment. Something I read about in the Yoga Sutras and discussed in my yoga course. I was not going to attach myself and hold on to this experience as it was coming to an end. I didn’t want this incredible trip to turn into pain, because we wouldn’t be traveling there anymore. We did the damn thing, we lived it to the fullest and we will never forget. But, instead of longing for it when it was over, I would keep the memories in my heart and then let it go. After all, there will be more traveling in the future. We’re already thinking about South America next winter. :) And, we’ve got work to do. Big, exciting changes ahead for Adrian and me. For now, we will focus on the present and see what happens. Bit by bit.
Nearly 40 hours of travel and we were hit smack in the face with the aftermath of the polar vortex. Adrian’s friend, Patrick, picked us up from the airport and helped us shovel out the snow in front of our storage unit. We opened the door and there sat Adrian’s car and our mound of sh!t-we-don’t-need sitting atop two inches of ice. Adrian’s car managed to start up no problem (Honda’s rock)! We grabbed small suitcases filled with some warmer clothing, because flip flops and light sweaters weren’t cutting it. Too bad our clothes were frozen solid in our suitcases.
Our friend, Molly, the one that spent a couple weeks with us in Thailand, graciously let us stay at her apartment for a few nights while she was becoming famous and giving speeches on mobile marketing at the SXSW festival in Austin, TX. As we drove to Molly’s to thaw out, I was shocked at the eyesore that is Chicago winter. Everything is dead. Bare trees, grey slush from halfway melted snow and no wildlife in site. Where was all the green? Where was the sunshine? Where were all the temples? Why weren’t we profusely sweating? We had just spent five months living in paradise after paradise and even when we were in big, dirty cities they were still vibrant and full of colorful life. So much for the non-attachment theory. :) Chicago in March is the pits.
We made it to Molly’s Home-Away-From-Home Retreat, I dropped my bags and immediately drew a bath. It had been five months since I soaked in a tub and let me tell you, it was magical with bath bubbles and all. Ahhhh. And then I got out and covered myself with a towel. Doesn’t sound that great, but this towel was amazing! It covered more than 1/4 of my body and was so fluffy. After attempting to cover up with teeny tiny towels for months, I forgot what towels felt like here. I used my phone to call my mom (actually made a call without using Skype) and to text my sibs (actually texted without using WhatsApp). I forgot 3G existed and became so confused to the fact that I could use the map application, send email and google something on-the-go without a wifi connection. I used a computer for the first time since we left. During our trip I wrote all blog posts, took all pics and researched and booked everything on my iPhone 4. After months of nothing but my phone, I can honestly say for the most part that the mobile web and many mobile apps are complete and utter $hit. There’s a lot of work to be done. To all my fellow user experience and content strategy coworkers, keep surging forward. I made my phone work for five months, but there were several frustrating moments. With these simple forgotten pleasures and some technology, my mood was starting to transform and America was looking up already. Now, it was time for the store. We bundled up with whatever we could and headed out for a brisk walk to Marianos market to pick up a few items for dinner. Fortunately for me, Molly has several winter coats and warm-weather gear. American grocery stores are unbelievable! They’re convenient, have massively wide aisles and whole sections dedicated to cheese. Our trip to the store proved to be overwhelming, exhilarating and expensive. 6:00 PM comes around and we could no longer keep our eyes open. 14-hour time difference got the best of us and we were out.
After two days of an unsuccessful apartment hunt in Chicago, we just weren’t feeling it and drove off to Akron, Ohio to visit my family. A quick, 6-hour drive and then we were greeted with smiling faces, hugs, kisses, gifts and a ridiculous amount of homemade food. My mom and Grandma Johnson put out a spread of homemade lasagna, a fabulous cheese plate, appetizers and chocolate-covered strawberries. Yep, America was still on the up and up!
We spent a week at my parents snuggling with my fam, eating homemade meals (my mom even made pho) and visiting some of my favorite restaurants, e.g. Parisson’s, The Barn, El Rincon and Pav’s for ice cream. Resting and stuffing our faces was just what we needed! We saw my cancer-free brother, Scotty, for the first time since his NHL was declared in remission. We got to spend my brother, Joey’s, 35th birthday with him. I got to catch up with some old friends. And, I turned my parents living room into a mini yoga studio and practiced teaching yoga nearly every day to Adrian and my family (including my 75 year old grandma). Thank you all for being so cooperative and supportive. I even taught my first yoga class on my own to 26 students at the Portage Lakes Fitness Center. The fitness center was my first job when I was 16 (now my baby sis works there) and the place where I took my very first yoga class many years ago. I was stoked and nervous to teach there, but it went really well.
Our week in Akron flew by. We had a fabulous time. There’s no place like home, but us gypsies are on the move. With homemade granola from mamma, brownies from Grandma Bobbie and plenty of other snacks, we headed out for an 18-hour drive to Florida. First stop: Lithia to visit Adrian’s family. Then off to Clearwater, Tampa and Bradenton to visit friends. We can’t wait to see all of our FL peeps, eat Puerto Rican and Cuban food and get back to some sunshine!

We flew into Chicago from Bali after layovers in Hong Kong and LA. Cold temps, snow and a storage unit covered in ice awaited us. I only shed a couple tears at the airport and quickly recovered from a would-have-been meltdown. Nope, no meltdowns here! I was practicing non-attachment. Something I read about in the Yoga Sutras and discussed in my yoga course. I was not going to attach myself and hold on to this experience as it was coming to an end. I didn’t want this incredible trip to turn into pain, because we wouldn’t be traveling there anymore. We did the damn thing, we lived it to the fullest and we will never forget. But, instead of longing for it when it was over, I would keep the memories in my heart and then let it go. After all, there will be more traveling in the future. We’re already thinking about South America next winter. :) And, we’ve got work to do. Big, exciting changes ahead for Adrian and me. For now, we will focus on the present and see what happens. Bit by bit.

Nearly 40 hours of travel and we were hit smack in the face with the aftermath of the polar vortex. Adrian’s friend, Patrick, picked us up from the airport and helped us shovel out the snow in front of our storage unit. We opened the door and there sat Adrian’s car and our mound of sh!t-we-don’t-need sitting atop two inches of ice. Adrian’s car managed to start up no problem (Honda’s rock)! We grabbed small suitcases filled with some warmer clothing, because flip flops and light sweaters weren’t cutting it. Too bad our clothes were frozen solid in our suitcases.

Our friend, Molly, the one that spent a couple weeks with us in Thailand, graciously let us stay at her apartment for a few nights while she was becoming famous and giving speeches on mobile marketing at the SXSW festival in Austin, TX. As we drove to Molly’s to thaw out, I was shocked at the eyesore that is Chicago winter. Everything is dead. Bare trees, grey slush from halfway melted snow and no wildlife in site. Where was all the green? Where was the sunshine? Where were all the temples? Why weren’t we profusely sweating? We had just spent five months living in paradise after paradise and even when we were in big, dirty cities they were still vibrant and full of colorful life. So much for the non-attachment theory. :) Chicago in March is the pits.

We made it to Molly’s Home-Away-From-Home Retreat, I dropped my bags and immediately drew a bath. It had been five months since I soaked in a tub and let me tell you, it was magical with bath bubbles and all. Ahhhh. And then I got out and covered myself with a towel. Doesn’t sound that great, but this towel was amazing! It covered more than 1/4 of my body and was so fluffy. After attempting to cover up with teeny tiny towels for months, I forgot what towels felt like here. I used my phone to call my mom (actually made a call without using Skype) and to text my sibs (actually texted without using WhatsApp). I forgot 3G existed and became so confused to the fact that I could use the map application, send email and google something on-the-go without a wifi connection. I used a computer for the first time since we left. During our trip I wrote all blog posts, took all pics and researched and booked everything on my iPhone 4. After months of nothing but my phone, I can honestly say for the most part that the mobile web and many mobile apps are complete and utter $hit. There’s a lot of work to be done. To all my fellow user experience and content strategy coworkers, keep surging forward. I made my phone work for five months, but there were several frustrating moments. With these simple forgotten pleasures and some technology, my mood was starting to transform and America was looking up already. Now, it was time for the store. We bundled up with whatever we could and headed out for a brisk walk to Marianos market to pick up a few items for dinner. Fortunately for me, Molly has several winter coats and warm-weather gear. American grocery stores are unbelievable! They’re convenient, have massively wide aisles and whole sections dedicated to cheese. Our trip to the store proved to be overwhelming, exhilarating and expensive. 6:00 PM comes around and we could no longer keep our eyes open. 14-hour time difference got the best of us and we were out.

After two days of an unsuccessful apartment hunt in Chicago, we just weren’t feeling it and drove off to Akron, Ohio to visit my family. A quick, 6-hour drive and then we were greeted with smiling faces, hugs, kisses, gifts and a ridiculous amount of homemade food. My mom and Grandma Johnson put out a spread of homemade lasagna, a fabulous cheese plate, appetizers and chocolate-covered strawberries. Yep, America was still on the up and up!

We spent a week at my parents snuggling with my fam, eating homemade meals (my mom even made pho) and visiting some of my favorite restaurants, e.g. Parisson’s, The Barn, El Rincon and Pav’s for ice cream. Resting and stuffing our faces was just what we needed! We saw my cancer-free brother, Scotty, for the first time since his NHL was declared in remission. We got to spend my brother, Joey’s, 35th birthday with him. I got to catch up with some old friends. And, I turned my parents living room into a mini yoga studio and practiced teaching yoga nearly every day to Adrian and my family (including my 75 year old grandma). Thank you all for being so cooperative and supportive. I even taught my first yoga class on my own to 26 students at the Portage Lakes Fitness Center. The fitness center was my first job when I was 16 (now my baby sis works there) and the place where I took my very first yoga class many years ago. I was stoked and nervous to teach there, but it went really well.

Our week in Akron flew by. We had a fabulous time. There’s no place like home, but us gypsies are on the move. With homemade granola from mamma, brownies from Grandma Bobbie and plenty of other snacks, we headed out for an 18-hour drive to Florida. First stop: Lithia to visit Adrian’s family. Then off to Clearwater, Tampa and Bradenton to visit friends. We can’t wait to see all of our FL peeps, eat Puerto Rican and Cuban food and get back to some sunshine!

Our route & timeline:

6 countries, 28 cities, 37 accommodations, 12 flights, 25 bus rides, 11 boat rides

Note: slightly different for Adrian since he went to New Zealand and Australia, while I went to Sulawesi and Java in Indonesia before we met up in Bali. 

THAILAND:
Oct 8- OHR -> HTW -> BKK 
18 hr flight, 27 hr travel time

A.) Oct 10- Bangkok
(7 nights) w/ 1 night in Pattaya (2-hr bus each way)
3 hotels

VIETNAM:
B.) Oct 17- Hanoi
1.5 hour flight
(3 nights)

C.) Oct 20 - Halong Bay 
4-hr bus ride & 4-hr bus ride back to hanoi
(1 night)

D.) Oct 21 - Ninh Binh
2-hr bus ride
(1 night)

Oct 22 - overnight bus 

E.) Oct 23 - Hoi An
17-hr sleeper bus ride
(3 nights)

Oct 26 - overnight bus

F.) Oct 27 - Ho Chi Minh City
26-hr sleeper bus ride
(5 nights)

CAMBODIA:
G.) Nov 1 - Phnom Phen
6-hr bus ride
(2 nights)

H.) Nov 3 - Sianukeville
5-hr bus ride
(1 night)

I.) Nov 4 - Koh Rong Saleom 
2-hr boat ride
(3 nights)

Nov 7- overnight bus ride

J.) Nov 8 - Siem Reap
12-hour sleeper bus ride
(3 nights)

Nov 11 - overnight bus ride

THAILAND:
K.) Nov 12 - Chiang Mai
10-hour bus ride to Bangkok
1.5 hour flight to Chiang Mai
(6 nights)
2 hotels

L.) Nov 19 - Krabi
Flight
(1 night)

M.) Nov 20 - Ko Lanta
2-hour boat ride
(4 nights)

N.) Nov 24 - Phuket
5-hour van ride
(3 nights)

O.) Nov 27 - Kaoh Sok National Park
4-hour bus ride
(3 nights)

P.) Nov 30 - Koh Tao
4-hour bus ride 
2 2-hour boat rides
(2 nights hotel)
(1 month apt)

MALAYSIA:
Q.) Dec 29 - Penang
Overnite boat ride & 3 vans - 24-hr 
(4 nights)

R.) Jan 3 - Cameron Highlands
5-hour bus ride
(2 nights)

S.) Jan 5 - KL
4-hour bus ride
(5 nights)

T.) Jan 10 - Melaka
2-hour bus ride
(2 nights)

U.) Jan 12 - Singapore
5-hour bus ride 
(3 nights)

***********************************************
Adrian and I went our separate ways for 2.5 weeks. He went to New Zealand and Australia for work, while I went to Indonesia. We eventually met up in Bali. 

INDONESIA:
A.) Jan 15 - Manado
2 3-hr flights 
(1 night)

B.) Jan 16 - Bunaken
1-hr taxi ride
1-hr boat ride
(3 nights)

C.) Jan 19 - Manado
1-hr boat ride
1-hr taxi ride
(1 night)

D.) Jan 20 - Yogyjakarta
2 flights (1-hr & 2-hr)
(1 night) hotel
(4 nights) another hotel

E.) Jan 25 - Bromo
13-hr van ride
(1 night)

F.) Jan 26 - Ijen
5-hr van ride
(1 night)

G.) Jan 27 - Bali
1-hr ferry ride
2 2-hr bus rides
(1 night in Kuta)
(2 nights in Sanur)
(3 nights in Ubud)
(1 month in Sanur)

H.) March 5 - Lembongan
30-min boat ride
(2 nights) Our route & timeline:

6 countries, 28 cities, 37 accommodations, 12 flights, 25 bus rides, 11 boat rides

Note: slightly different for Adrian since he went to New Zealand and Australia, while I went to Sulawesi and Java in Indonesia before we met up in Bali. 

THAILAND:
Oct 8- OHR -> HTW -> BKK 
18 hr flight, 27 hr travel time

A.) Oct 10- Bangkok
(7 nights) w/ 1 night in Pattaya (2-hr bus each way)
3 hotels

VIETNAM:
B.) Oct 17- Hanoi
1.5 hour flight
(3 nights)

C.) Oct 20 - Halong Bay 
4-hr bus ride & 4-hr bus ride back to hanoi
(1 night)

D.) Oct 21 - Ninh Binh
2-hr bus ride
(1 night)

Oct 22 - overnight bus 

E.) Oct 23 - Hoi An
17-hr sleeper bus ride
(3 nights)

Oct 26 - overnight bus

F.) Oct 27 - Ho Chi Minh City
26-hr sleeper bus ride
(5 nights)

CAMBODIA:
G.) Nov 1 - Phnom Phen
6-hr bus ride
(2 nights)

H.) Nov 3 - Sianukeville
5-hr bus ride
(1 night)

I.) Nov 4 - Koh Rong Saleom 
2-hr boat ride
(3 nights)

Nov 7- overnight bus ride

J.) Nov 8 - Siem Reap
12-hour sleeper bus ride
(3 nights)

Nov 11 - overnight bus ride

THAILAND:
K.) Nov 12 - Chiang Mai
10-hour bus ride to Bangkok
1.5 hour flight to Chiang Mai
(6 nights)
2 hotels

L.) Nov 19 - Krabi
Flight
(1 night)

M.) Nov 20 - Ko Lanta
2-hour boat ride
(4 nights)

N.) Nov 24 - Phuket
5-hour van ride
(3 nights)

O.) Nov 27 - Kaoh Sok National Park
4-hour bus ride
(3 nights)

P.) Nov 30 - Koh Tao
4-hour bus ride 
2 2-hour boat rides
(2 nights hotel)
(1 month apt)

MALAYSIA:
Q.) Dec 29 - Penang
Overnite boat ride & 3 vans - 24-hr 
(4 nights)

R.) Jan 3 - Cameron Highlands
5-hour bus ride
(2 nights)

S.) Jan 5 - KL
4-hour bus ride
(5 nights)

T.) Jan 10 - Melaka
2-hour bus ride
(2 nights)

U.) Jan 12 - Singapore
5-hour bus ride 
(3 nights)

***********************************************
Adrian and I went our separate ways for 2.5 weeks. He went to New Zealand and Australia for work, while I went to Indonesia. We eventually met up in Bali. 

INDONESIA:
A.) Jan 15 - Manado
2 3-hr flights 
(1 night)

B.) Jan 16 - Bunaken
1-hr taxi ride
1-hr boat ride
(3 nights)

C.) Jan 19 - Manado
1-hr boat ride
1-hr taxi ride
(1 night)

D.) Jan 20 - Yogyjakarta
2 flights (1-hr & 2-hr)
(1 night) hotel
(4 nights) another hotel

E.) Jan 25 - Bromo
13-hr van ride
(1 night)

F.) Jan 26 - Ijen
5-hr van ride
(1 night)

G.) Jan 27 - Bali
1-hr ferry ride
2 2-hr bus rides
(1 night in Kuta)
(2 nights in Sanur)
(3 nights in Ubud)
(1 month in Sanur)

H.) March 5 - Lembongan
30-min boat ride
(2 nights) Our route & timeline:

6 countries, 28 cities, 37 accommodations, 12 flights, 25 bus rides, 11 boat rides

Note: slightly different for Adrian since he went to New Zealand and Australia, while I went to Sulawesi and Java in Indonesia before we met up in Bali. 

THAILAND:
Oct 8- OHR -> HTW -> BKK 
18 hr flight, 27 hr travel time

A.) Oct 10- Bangkok
(7 nights) w/ 1 night in Pattaya (2-hr bus each way)
3 hotels

VIETNAM:
B.) Oct 17- Hanoi
1.5 hour flight
(3 nights)

C.) Oct 20 - Halong Bay 
4-hr bus ride & 4-hr bus ride back to hanoi
(1 night)

D.) Oct 21 - Ninh Binh
2-hr bus ride
(1 night)

Oct 22 - overnight bus 

E.) Oct 23 - Hoi An
17-hr sleeper bus ride
(3 nights)

Oct 26 - overnight bus

F.) Oct 27 - Ho Chi Minh City
26-hr sleeper bus ride
(5 nights)

CAMBODIA:
G.) Nov 1 - Phnom Phen
6-hr bus ride
(2 nights)

H.) Nov 3 - Sianukeville
5-hr bus ride
(1 night)

I.) Nov 4 - Koh Rong Saleom 
2-hr boat ride
(3 nights)

Nov 7- overnight bus ride

J.) Nov 8 - Siem Reap
12-hour sleeper bus ride
(3 nights)

Nov 11 - overnight bus ride

THAILAND:
K.) Nov 12 - Chiang Mai
10-hour bus ride to Bangkok
1.5 hour flight to Chiang Mai
(6 nights)
2 hotels

L.) Nov 19 - Krabi
Flight
(1 night)

M.) Nov 20 - Ko Lanta
2-hour boat ride
(4 nights)

N.) Nov 24 - Phuket
5-hour van ride
(3 nights)

O.) Nov 27 - Kaoh Sok National Park
4-hour bus ride
(3 nights)

P.) Nov 30 - Koh Tao
4-hour bus ride 
2 2-hour boat rides
(2 nights hotel)
(1 month apt)

MALAYSIA:
Q.) Dec 29 - Penang
Overnite boat ride & 3 vans - 24-hr 
(4 nights)

R.) Jan 3 - Cameron Highlands
5-hour bus ride
(2 nights)

S.) Jan 5 - KL
4-hour bus ride
(5 nights)

T.) Jan 10 - Melaka
2-hour bus ride
(2 nights)

U.) Jan 12 - Singapore
5-hour bus ride 
(3 nights)

***********************************************
Adrian and I went our separate ways for 2.5 weeks. He went to New Zealand and Australia for work, while I went to Indonesia. We eventually met up in Bali. 

INDONESIA:
A.) Jan 15 - Manado
2 3-hr flights 
(1 night)

B.) Jan 16 - Bunaken
1-hr taxi ride
1-hr boat ride
(3 nights)

C.) Jan 19 - Manado
1-hr boat ride
1-hr taxi ride
(1 night)

D.) Jan 20 - Yogyjakarta
2 flights (1-hr & 2-hr)
(1 night) hotel
(4 nights) another hotel

E.) Jan 25 - Bromo
13-hr van ride
(1 night)

F.) Jan 26 - Ijen
5-hr van ride
(1 night)

G.) Jan 27 - Bali
1-hr ferry ride
2 2-hr bus rides
(1 night in Kuta)
(2 nights in Sanur)
(3 nights in Ubud)
(1 month in Sanur)

H.) March 5 - Lembongan
30-min boat ride
(2 nights)

Our route & timeline:

6 countries, 28 cities, 37 accommodations, 12 flights, 25 bus rides, 11 boat rides

Note: slightly different for Adrian since he went to New Zealand and Australia, while I went to Sulawesi and Java in Indonesia before we met up in Bali.

THAILAND:
Oct 8- OHR -> HTW -> BKK
18 hr flight, 27 hr travel time

A.) Oct 10- Bangkok
(7 nights) w/ 1 night in Pattaya (2-hr bus each way)
3 hotels

VIETNAM:
B.) Oct 17- Hanoi
1.5 hour flight
(3 nights)

C.) Oct 20 - Halong Bay
4-hr bus ride & 4-hr bus ride back to hanoi
(1 night)

D.) Oct 21 - Ninh Binh
2-hr bus ride
(1 night)

Oct 22 - overnight bus

E.) Oct 23 - Hoi An
17-hr sleeper bus ride
(3 nights)

Oct 26 - overnight bus

F.) Oct 27 - Ho Chi Minh City
26-hr sleeper bus ride
(5 nights)

CAMBODIA:
G.) Nov 1 - Phnom Phen
6-hr bus ride
(2 nights)

H.) Nov 3 - Sianukeville
5-hr bus ride
(1 night)

I.) Nov 4 - Koh Rong Saleom
2-hr boat ride
(3 nights)

Nov 7- overnight bus ride

J.) Nov 8 - Siem Reap
12-hour sleeper bus ride
(3 nights)

Nov 11 - overnight bus ride

THAILAND:
K.) Nov 12 - Chiang Mai
10-hour bus ride to Bangkok
1.5 hour flight to Chiang Mai
(6 nights)
2 hotels

L.) Nov 19 - Krabi
Flight
(1 night)

M.) Nov 20 - Ko Lanta
2-hour boat ride
(4 nights)

N.) Nov 24 - Phuket
5-hour van ride
(3 nights)

O.) Nov 27 - Kaoh Sok National Park
4-hour bus ride
(3 nights)

P.) Nov 30 - Koh Tao
4-hour bus ride
2 2-hour boat rides
(2 nights hotel)
(1 month apt)

MALAYSIA:
Q.) Dec 29 - Penang
Overnite boat ride & 3 vans - 24-hr
(4 nights)

R.) Jan 3 - Cameron Highlands
5-hour bus ride
(2 nights)

S.) Jan 5 - KL
4-hour bus ride
(5 nights)

T.) Jan 10 - Melaka
2-hour bus ride
(2 nights)

U.) Jan 12 - Singapore
5-hour bus ride
(3 nights)

***********************************************
Adrian and I went our separate ways for 2.5 weeks. He went to New Zealand and Australia for work, while I went to Indonesia. We eventually met up in Bali.

INDONESIA:
A.) Jan 15 - Manado
2 3-hr flights
(1 night)

B.) Jan 16 - Bunaken
1-hr taxi ride
1-hr boat ride
(3 nights)

C.) Jan 19 - Manado
1-hr boat ride
1-hr taxi ride
(1 night)

D.) Jan 20 - Yogyjakarta
2 flights (1-hr & 2-hr)
(1 night) hotel
(4 nights) another hotel

E.) Jan 25 - Bromo
13-hr van ride
(1 night)

F.) Jan 26 - Ijen
5-hr van ride
(1 night)

G.) Jan 27 - Bali
1-hr ferry ride
2 2-hr bus rides
(1 night in Kuta)
(2 nights in Sanur)
(3 nights in Ubud)
(1 month in Sanur)

H.) March 5 - Lembongan
30-min boat ride
(2 nights)

The eagle has landed!

One more leg from LA to Chicago for a total of 34 hours.

Bali -> Hong Kong - 4.5 hrs
2-hr layover
Hong Kong -> LA - 14 hrs
9-hr layover (ouch)
LA -> Chicago - 4.5 hrs

We spent our last two nights in Lembongan, an island just southeast of Bali. Our days were filled with swimming in turquoise waters, snorkeling with manta rays, motorbiking around the island, eating ridiculously inexpensive, fresh seafood and soaking up the sunsets. Not a bad way to end five thrilling months in SE Asia. We spent our last two nights in Lembongan, an island just southeast of Bali. Our days were filled with swimming in turquoise waters, snorkeling with manta rays, motorbiking around the island, eating ridiculously inexpensive, fresh seafood and soaking up the sunsets. Not a bad way to end five thrilling months in SE Asia. We spent our last two nights in Lembongan, an island just southeast of Bali. Our days were filled with swimming in turquoise waters, snorkeling with manta rays, motorbiking around the island, eating ridiculously inexpensive, fresh seafood and soaking up the sunsets. Not a bad way to end five thrilling months in SE Asia. We spent our last two nights in Lembongan, an island just southeast of Bali. Our days were filled with swimming in turquoise waters, snorkeling with manta rays, motorbiking around the island, eating ridiculously inexpensive, fresh seafood and soaking up the sunsets. Not a bad way to end five thrilling months in SE Asia. We spent our last two nights in Lembongan, an island just southeast of Bali. Our days were filled with swimming in turquoise waters, snorkeling with manta rays, motorbiking around the island, eating ridiculously inexpensive, fresh seafood and soaking up the sunsets. Not a bad way to end five thrilling months in SE Asia. We spent our last two nights in Lembongan, an island just southeast of Bali. Our days were filled with swimming in turquoise waters, snorkeling with manta rays, motorbiking around the island, eating ridiculously inexpensive, fresh seafood and soaking up the sunsets. Not a bad way to end five thrilling months in SE Asia. We spent our last two nights in Lembongan, an island just southeast of Bali. Our days were filled with swimming in turquoise waters, snorkeling with manta rays, motorbiking around the island, eating ridiculously inexpensive, fresh seafood and soaking up the sunsets. Not a bad way to end five thrilling months in SE Asia. We spent our last two nights in Lembongan, an island just southeast of Bali. Our days were filled with swimming in turquoise waters, snorkeling with manta rays, motorbiking around the island, eating ridiculously inexpensive, fresh seafood and soaking up the sunsets. Not a bad way to end five thrilling months in SE Asia. We spent our last two nights in Lembongan, an island just southeast of Bali. Our days were filled with swimming in turquoise waters, snorkeling with manta rays, motorbiking around the island, eating ridiculously inexpensive, fresh seafood and soaking up the sunsets. Not a bad way to end five thrilling months in SE Asia. We spent our last two nights in Lembongan, an island just southeast of Bali. Our days were filled with swimming in turquoise waters, snorkeling with manta rays, motorbiking around the island, eating ridiculously inexpensive, fresh seafood and soaking up the sunsets. Not a bad way to end five thrilling months in SE Asia.

We spent our last two nights in Lembongan, an island just southeast of Bali. Our days were filled with swimming in turquoise waters, snorkeling with manta rays, motorbiking around the island, eating ridiculously inexpensive, fresh seafood and soaking up the sunsets. Not a bad way to end five thrilling months in SE Asia.

Atha Yoganushasanum…
…or in English, Yoga Begins Now
It’s been four sweat-induced weeks since I anxiously walked into the beautiful bamboo structure that is Power of Now Oasis in Sanur, Bali. I’ve got roots here now. Yoga roots! And, I hope to visit again soon. I had the privilege of studying yoga with Jolie Manza, an inspirational, knowledgable, and passionate instructor who I will forever be grateful for. I studied with 13 others from around the globe including my dear Olga from Moscow and Bella from London who have left their mark on me and have given me much love and support. I truly enjoyed the company of the entire group. I am also grateful for my partner in crime, Adrian, who sticks by my side, goes with the flow and is a rock of support for me. He became a regular at the yoga studio and won over the hearts of all the girls. :)
Okay, I’m not going to beat around the bush (literally…just keep reading), the month was physically challenging. I’ve been practicing the physical side of yoga (asana) off and on for years, but was never serious or dedicated to practicing every day until now. I was sore and pushed it a bit too hard, which resulted in a strain in an area where the sun don’t shine. Hello to my very first acupuncture experience. Yep! A total stranger sticking needles in…you guessed it…an area where the sun don’t shine. Ahhhhh! I continued to practice, but backed off of certain postures and let myself heal. Almost there!
Aside from the physical aspect, there were times when I felt like my brain was going to explode, but I loved it and soaked everything in like a thirsty sponge. We focused on the eight limbs of yoga. The physical practice of yoga was the only area I had previously tapped into prior to this course, so I was eager to learn. Basically, the eight limbs are guidelines and practices for moral and ethical conduct. They focus on self-discipline and help us to acknowledge the spiritual aspects of our nature. As a famous yogi, B.K.S. Iyengar, once said, “Without the yamas and niyamas, asana is mere acrobatics.” Yamas and niyamas are the first two limbs and consist of external ethical standards and internal self-discipline.
We read and discussed the Yoga Sutras, which is a heady, philosophical text that’s basically a guide for how to not suck at life. I will practice every day. We worked on pranayama (breath) techniques, practiced calming the monkey mind through meditation. We spent time breaking down each and every posture to learn about proper alignment, risk areas, modifications, variations and the ancient Sanskrit language names. The month was non-stop and it flew by. There were a couple hours here and there reserved for playtime. When you’re at a yoga studio in Bali on the Indian Ocean, playtime consists of a bunch of yogis surfing and sailing on the studio’s 52-foot sailboat. Score!
The last week of the course we had to create a class sequence and teach a class at the studio as well as complete a 3-hour written exam. And, now I’m a certified yoga instructor! I have a solid foundation to start from, but much more to discover. This is just the beginning of a lifetime of learning. I look forward to sharing the practice and seeing what comes of this.
“Change is not something that we should fear. Rather, it is something that we should welcome. For without change, nothing in this world would ever grow or blossom, and no one in this world would ever move forward to become the person they’re meant to be.” -B.K.S. Iyengar Atha Yoganushasanum…
…or in English, Yoga Begins Now
It’s been four sweat-induced weeks since I anxiously walked into the beautiful bamboo structure that is Power of Now Oasis in Sanur, Bali. I’ve got roots here now. Yoga roots! And, I hope to visit again soon. I had the privilege of studying yoga with Jolie Manza, an inspirational, knowledgable, and passionate instructor who I will forever be grateful for. I studied with 13 others from around the globe including my dear Olga from Moscow and Bella from London who have left their mark on me and have given me much love and support. I truly enjoyed the company of the entire group. I am also grateful for my partner in crime, Adrian, who sticks by my side, goes with the flow and is a rock of support for me. He became a regular at the yoga studio and won over the hearts of all the girls. :)
Okay, I’m not going to beat around the bush (literally…just keep reading), the month was physically challenging. I’ve been practicing the physical side of yoga (asana) off and on for years, but was never serious or dedicated to practicing every day until now. I was sore and pushed it a bit too hard, which resulted in a strain in an area where the sun don’t shine. Hello to my very first acupuncture experience. Yep! A total stranger sticking needles in…you guessed it…an area where the sun don’t shine. Ahhhhh! I continued to practice, but backed off of certain postures and let myself heal. Almost there!
Aside from the physical aspect, there were times when I felt like my brain was going to explode, but I loved it and soaked everything in like a thirsty sponge. We focused on the eight limbs of yoga. The physical practice of yoga was the only area I had previously tapped into prior to this course, so I was eager to learn. Basically, the eight limbs are guidelines and practices for moral and ethical conduct. They focus on self-discipline and help us to acknowledge the spiritual aspects of our nature. As a famous yogi, B.K.S. Iyengar, once said, “Without the yamas and niyamas, asana is mere acrobatics.” Yamas and niyamas are the first two limbs and consist of external ethical standards and internal self-discipline.
We read and discussed the Yoga Sutras, which is a heady, philosophical text that’s basically a guide for how to not suck at life. I will practice every day. We worked on pranayama (breath) techniques, practiced calming the monkey mind through meditation. We spent time breaking down each and every posture to learn about proper alignment, risk areas, modifications, variations and the ancient Sanskrit language names. The month was non-stop and it flew by. There were a couple hours here and there reserved for playtime. When you’re at a yoga studio in Bali on the Indian Ocean, playtime consists of a bunch of yogis surfing and sailing on the studio’s 52-foot sailboat. Score!
The last week of the course we had to create a class sequence and teach a class at the studio as well as complete a 3-hour written exam. And, now I’m a certified yoga instructor! I have a solid foundation to start from, but much more to discover. This is just the beginning of a lifetime of learning. I look forward to sharing the practice and seeing what comes of this.
“Change is not something that we should fear. Rather, it is something that we should welcome. For without change, nothing in this world would ever grow or blossom, and no one in this world would ever move forward to become the person they’re meant to be.” -B.K.S. Iyengar Atha Yoganushasanum…
…or in English, Yoga Begins Now
It’s been four sweat-induced weeks since I anxiously walked into the beautiful bamboo structure that is Power of Now Oasis in Sanur, Bali. I’ve got roots here now. Yoga roots! And, I hope to visit again soon. I had the privilege of studying yoga with Jolie Manza, an inspirational, knowledgable, and passionate instructor who I will forever be grateful for. I studied with 13 others from around the globe including my dear Olga from Moscow and Bella from London who have left their mark on me and have given me much love and support. I truly enjoyed the company of the entire group. I am also grateful for my partner in crime, Adrian, who sticks by my side, goes with the flow and is a rock of support for me. He became a regular at the yoga studio and won over the hearts of all the girls. :)
Okay, I’m not going to beat around the bush (literally…just keep reading), the month was physically challenging. I’ve been practicing the physical side of yoga (asana) off and on for years, but was never serious or dedicated to practicing every day until now. I was sore and pushed it a bit too hard, which resulted in a strain in an area where the sun don’t shine. Hello to my very first acupuncture experience. Yep! A total stranger sticking needles in…you guessed it…an area where the sun don’t shine. Ahhhhh! I continued to practice, but backed off of certain postures and let myself heal. Almost there!
Aside from the physical aspect, there were times when I felt like my brain was going to explode, but I loved it and soaked everything in like a thirsty sponge. We focused on the eight limbs of yoga. The physical practice of yoga was the only area I had previously tapped into prior to this course, so I was eager to learn. Basically, the eight limbs are guidelines and practices for moral and ethical conduct. They focus on self-discipline and help us to acknowledge the spiritual aspects of our nature. As a famous yogi, B.K.S. Iyengar, once said, “Without the yamas and niyamas, asana is mere acrobatics.” Yamas and niyamas are the first two limbs and consist of external ethical standards and internal self-discipline.
We read and discussed the Yoga Sutras, which is a heady, philosophical text that’s basically a guide for how to not suck at life. I will practice every day. We worked on pranayama (breath) techniques, practiced calming the monkey mind through meditation. We spent time breaking down each and every posture to learn about proper alignment, risk areas, modifications, variations and the ancient Sanskrit language names. The month was non-stop and it flew by. There were a couple hours here and there reserved for playtime. When you’re at a yoga studio in Bali on the Indian Ocean, playtime consists of a bunch of yogis surfing and sailing on the studio’s 52-foot sailboat. Score!
The last week of the course we had to create a class sequence and teach a class at the studio as well as complete a 3-hour written exam. And, now I’m a certified yoga instructor! I have a solid foundation to start from, but much more to discover. This is just the beginning of a lifetime of learning. I look forward to sharing the practice and seeing what comes of this.
“Change is not something that we should fear. Rather, it is something that we should welcome. For without change, nothing in this world would ever grow or blossom, and no one in this world would ever move forward to become the person they’re meant to be.” -B.K.S. Iyengar Atha Yoganushasanum…
…or in English, Yoga Begins Now
It’s been four sweat-induced weeks since I anxiously walked into the beautiful bamboo structure that is Power of Now Oasis in Sanur, Bali. I’ve got roots here now. Yoga roots! And, I hope to visit again soon. I had the privilege of studying yoga with Jolie Manza, an inspirational, knowledgable, and passionate instructor who I will forever be grateful for. I studied with 13 others from around the globe including my dear Olga from Moscow and Bella from London who have left their mark on me and have given me much love and support. I truly enjoyed the company of the entire group. I am also grateful for my partner in crime, Adrian, who sticks by my side, goes with the flow and is a rock of support for me. He became a regular at the yoga studio and won over the hearts of all the girls. :)
Okay, I’m not going to beat around the bush (literally…just keep reading), the month was physically challenging. I’ve been practicing the physical side of yoga (asana) off and on for years, but was never serious or dedicated to practicing every day until now. I was sore and pushed it a bit too hard, which resulted in a strain in an area where the sun don’t shine. Hello to my very first acupuncture experience. Yep! A total stranger sticking needles in…you guessed it…an area where the sun don’t shine. Ahhhhh! I continued to practice, but backed off of certain postures and let myself heal. Almost there!
Aside from the physical aspect, there were times when I felt like my brain was going to explode, but I loved it and soaked everything in like a thirsty sponge. We focused on the eight limbs of yoga. The physical practice of yoga was the only area I had previously tapped into prior to this course, so I was eager to learn. Basically, the eight limbs are guidelines and practices for moral and ethical conduct. They focus on self-discipline and help us to acknowledge the spiritual aspects of our nature. As a famous yogi, B.K.S. Iyengar, once said, “Without the yamas and niyamas, asana is mere acrobatics.” Yamas and niyamas are the first two limbs and consist of external ethical standards and internal self-discipline.
We read and discussed the Yoga Sutras, which is a heady, philosophical text that’s basically a guide for how to not suck at life. I will practice every day. We worked on pranayama (breath) techniques, practiced calming the monkey mind through meditation. We spent time breaking down each and every posture to learn about proper alignment, risk areas, modifications, variations and the ancient Sanskrit language names. The month was non-stop and it flew by. There were a couple hours here and there reserved for playtime. When you’re at a yoga studio in Bali on the Indian Ocean, playtime consists of a bunch of yogis surfing and sailing on the studio’s 52-foot sailboat. Score!
The last week of the course we had to create a class sequence and teach a class at the studio as well as complete a 3-hour written exam. And, now I’m a certified yoga instructor! I have a solid foundation to start from, but much more to discover. This is just the beginning of a lifetime of learning. I look forward to sharing the practice and seeing what comes of this.
“Change is not something that we should fear. Rather, it is something that we should welcome. For without change, nothing in this world would ever grow or blossom, and no one in this world would ever move forward to become the person they’re meant to be.” -B.K.S. Iyengar Atha Yoganushasanum…
…or in English, Yoga Begins Now
It’s been four sweat-induced weeks since I anxiously walked into the beautiful bamboo structure that is Power of Now Oasis in Sanur, Bali. I’ve got roots here now. Yoga roots! And, I hope to visit again soon. I had the privilege of studying yoga with Jolie Manza, an inspirational, knowledgable, and passionate instructor who I will forever be grateful for. I studied with 13 others from around the globe including my dear Olga from Moscow and Bella from London who have left their mark on me and have given me much love and support. I truly enjoyed the company of the entire group. I am also grateful for my partner in crime, Adrian, who sticks by my side, goes with the flow and is a rock of support for me. He became a regular at the yoga studio and won over the hearts of all the girls. :)
Okay, I’m not going to beat around the bush (literally…just keep reading), the month was physically challenging. I’ve been practicing the physical side of yoga (asana) off and on for years, but was never serious or dedicated to practicing every day until now. I was sore and pushed it a bit too hard, which resulted in a strain in an area where the sun don’t shine. Hello to my very first acupuncture experience. Yep! A total stranger sticking needles in…you guessed it…an area where the sun don’t shine. Ahhhhh! I continued to practice, but backed off of certain postures and let myself heal. Almost there!
Aside from the physical aspect, there were times when I felt like my brain was going to explode, but I loved it and soaked everything in like a thirsty sponge. We focused on the eight limbs of yoga. The physical practice of yoga was the only area I had previously tapped into prior to this course, so I was eager to learn. Basically, the eight limbs are guidelines and practices for moral and ethical conduct. They focus on self-discipline and help us to acknowledge the spiritual aspects of our nature. As a famous yogi, B.K.S. Iyengar, once said, “Without the yamas and niyamas, asana is mere acrobatics.” Yamas and niyamas are the first two limbs and consist of external ethical standards and internal self-discipline.
We read and discussed the Yoga Sutras, which is a heady, philosophical text that’s basically a guide for how to not suck at life. I will practice every day. We worked on pranayama (breath) techniques, practiced calming the monkey mind through meditation. We spent time breaking down each and every posture to learn about proper alignment, risk areas, modifications, variations and the ancient Sanskrit language names. The month was non-stop and it flew by. There were a couple hours here and there reserved for playtime. When you’re at a yoga studio in Bali on the Indian Ocean, playtime consists of a bunch of yogis surfing and sailing on the studio’s 52-foot sailboat. Score!
The last week of the course we had to create a class sequence and teach a class at the studio as well as complete a 3-hour written exam. And, now I’m a certified yoga instructor! I have a solid foundation to start from, but much more to discover. This is just the beginning of a lifetime of learning. I look forward to sharing the practice and seeing what comes of this.
“Change is not something that we should fear. Rather, it is something that we should welcome. For without change, nothing in this world would ever grow or blossom, and no one in this world would ever move forward to become the person they’re meant to be.” -B.K.S. Iyengar Atha Yoganushasanum…
…or in English, Yoga Begins Now
It’s been four sweat-induced weeks since I anxiously walked into the beautiful bamboo structure that is Power of Now Oasis in Sanur, Bali. I’ve got roots here now. Yoga roots! And, I hope to visit again soon. I had the privilege of studying yoga with Jolie Manza, an inspirational, knowledgable, and passionate instructor who I will forever be grateful for. I studied with 13 others from around the globe including my dear Olga from Moscow and Bella from London who have left their mark on me and have given me much love and support. I truly enjoyed the company of the entire group. I am also grateful for my partner in crime, Adrian, who sticks by my side, goes with the flow and is a rock of support for me. He became a regular at the yoga studio and won over the hearts of all the girls. :)
Okay, I’m not going to beat around the bush (literally…just keep reading), the month was physically challenging. I’ve been practicing the physical side of yoga (asana) off and on for years, but was never serious or dedicated to practicing every day until now. I was sore and pushed it a bit too hard, which resulted in a strain in an area where the sun don’t shine. Hello to my very first acupuncture experience. Yep! A total stranger sticking needles in…you guessed it…an area where the sun don’t shine. Ahhhhh! I continued to practice, but backed off of certain postures and let myself heal. Almost there!
Aside from the physical aspect, there were times when I felt like my brain was going to explode, but I loved it and soaked everything in like a thirsty sponge. We focused on the eight limbs of yoga. The physical practice of yoga was the only area I had previously tapped into prior to this course, so I was eager to learn. Basically, the eight limbs are guidelines and practices for moral and ethical conduct. They focus on self-discipline and help us to acknowledge the spiritual aspects of our nature. As a famous yogi, B.K.S. Iyengar, once said, “Without the yamas and niyamas, asana is mere acrobatics.” Yamas and niyamas are the first two limbs and consist of external ethical standards and internal self-discipline.
We read and discussed the Yoga Sutras, which is a heady, philosophical text that’s basically a guide for how to not suck at life. I will practice every day. We worked on pranayama (breath) techniques, practiced calming the monkey mind through meditation. We spent time breaking down each and every posture to learn about proper alignment, risk areas, modifications, variations and the ancient Sanskrit language names. The month was non-stop and it flew by. There were a couple hours here and there reserved for playtime. When you’re at a yoga studio in Bali on the Indian Ocean, playtime consists of a bunch of yogis surfing and sailing on the studio’s 52-foot sailboat. Score!
The last week of the course we had to create a class sequence and teach a class at the studio as well as complete a 3-hour written exam. And, now I’m a certified yoga instructor! I have a solid foundation to start from, but much more to discover. This is just the beginning of a lifetime of learning. I look forward to sharing the practice and seeing what comes of this.
“Change is not something that we should fear. Rather, it is something that we should welcome. For without change, nothing in this world would ever grow or blossom, and no one in this world would ever move forward to become the person they’re meant to be.” -B.K.S. Iyengar Atha Yoganushasanum…
…or in English, Yoga Begins Now
It’s been four sweat-induced weeks since I anxiously walked into the beautiful bamboo structure that is Power of Now Oasis in Sanur, Bali. I’ve got roots here now. Yoga roots! And, I hope to visit again soon. I had the privilege of studying yoga with Jolie Manza, an inspirational, knowledgable, and passionate instructor who I will forever be grateful for. I studied with 13 others from around the globe including my dear Olga from Moscow and Bella from London who have left their mark on me and have given me much love and support. I truly enjoyed the company of the entire group. I am also grateful for my partner in crime, Adrian, who sticks by my side, goes with the flow and is a rock of support for me. He became a regular at the yoga studio and won over the hearts of all the girls. :)
Okay, I’m not going to beat around the bush (literally…just keep reading), the month was physically challenging. I’ve been practicing the physical side of yoga (asana) off and on for years, but was never serious or dedicated to practicing every day until now. I was sore and pushed it a bit too hard, which resulted in a strain in an area where the sun don’t shine. Hello to my very first acupuncture experience. Yep! A total stranger sticking needles in…you guessed it…an area where the sun don’t shine. Ahhhhh! I continued to practice, but backed off of certain postures and let myself heal. Almost there!
Aside from the physical aspect, there were times when I felt like my brain was going to explode, but I loved it and soaked everything in like a thirsty sponge. We focused on the eight limbs of yoga. The physical practice of yoga was the only area I had previously tapped into prior to this course, so I was eager to learn. Basically, the eight limbs are guidelines and practices for moral and ethical conduct. They focus on self-discipline and help us to acknowledge the spiritual aspects of our nature. As a famous yogi, B.K.S. Iyengar, once said, “Without the yamas and niyamas, asana is mere acrobatics.” Yamas and niyamas are the first two limbs and consist of external ethical standards and internal self-discipline.
We read and discussed the Yoga Sutras, which is a heady, philosophical text that’s basically a guide for how to not suck at life. I will practice every day. We worked on pranayama (breath) techniques, practiced calming the monkey mind through meditation. We spent time breaking down each and every posture to learn about proper alignment, risk areas, modifications, variations and the ancient Sanskrit language names. The month was non-stop and it flew by. There were a couple hours here and there reserved for playtime. When you’re at a yoga studio in Bali on the Indian Ocean, playtime consists of a bunch of yogis surfing and sailing on the studio’s 52-foot sailboat. Score!
The last week of the course we had to create a class sequence and teach a class at the studio as well as complete a 3-hour written exam. And, now I’m a certified yoga instructor! I have a solid foundation to start from, but much more to discover. This is just the beginning of a lifetime of learning. I look forward to sharing the practice and seeing what comes of this.
“Change is not something that we should fear. Rather, it is something that we should welcome. For without change, nothing in this world would ever grow or blossom, and no one in this world would ever move forward to become the person they’re meant to be.” -B.K.S. Iyengar Atha Yoganushasanum…
…or in English, Yoga Begins Now
It’s been four sweat-induced weeks since I anxiously walked into the beautiful bamboo structure that is Power of Now Oasis in Sanur, Bali. I’ve got roots here now. Yoga roots! And, I hope to visit again soon. I had the privilege of studying yoga with Jolie Manza, an inspirational, knowledgable, and passionate instructor who I will forever be grateful for. I studied with 13 others from around the globe including my dear Olga from Moscow and Bella from London who have left their mark on me and have given me much love and support. I truly enjoyed the company of the entire group. I am also grateful for my partner in crime, Adrian, who sticks by my side, goes with the flow and is a rock of support for me. He became a regular at the yoga studio and won over the hearts of all the girls. :)
Okay, I’m not going to beat around the bush (literally…just keep reading), the month was physically challenging. I’ve been practicing the physical side of yoga (asana) off and on for years, but was never serious or dedicated to practicing every day until now. I was sore and pushed it a bit too hard, which resulted in a strain in an area where the sun don’t shine. Hello to my very first acupuncture experience. Yep! A total stranger sticking needles in…you guessed it…an area where the sun don’t shine. Ahhhhh! I continued to practice, but backed off of certain postures and let myself heal. Almost there!
Aside from the physical aspect, there were times when I felt like my brain was going to explode, but I loved it and soaked everything in like a thirsty sponge. We focused on the eight limbs of yoga. The physical practice of yoga was the only area I had previously tapped into prior to this course, so I was eager to learn. Basically, the eight limbs are guidelines and practices for moral and ethical conduct. They focus on self-discipline and help us to acknowledge the spiritual aspects of our nature. As a famous yogi, B.K.S. Iyengar, once said, “Without the yamas and niyamas, asana is mere acrobatics.” Yamas and niyamas are the first two limbs and consist of external ethical standards and internal self-discipline.
We read and discussed the Yoga Sutras, which is a heady, philosophical text that’s basically a guide for how to not suck at life. I will practice every day. We worked on pranayama (breath) techniques, practiced calming the monkey mind through meditation. We spent time breaking down each and every posture to learn about proper alignment, risk areas, modifications, variations and the ancient Sanskrit language names. The month was non-stop and it flew by. There were a couple hours here and there reserved for playtime. When you’re at a yoga studio in Bali on the Indian Ocean, playtime consists of a bunch of yogis surfing and sailing on the studio’s 52-foot sailboat. Score!
The last week of the course we had to create a class sequence and teach a class at the studio as well as complete a 3-hour written exam. And, now I’m a certified yoga instructor! I have a solid foundation to start from, but much more to discover. This is just the beginning of a lifetime of learning. I look forward to sharing the practice and seeing what comes of this.
“Change is not something that we should fear. Rather, it is something that we should welcome. For without change, nothing in this world would ever grow or blossom, and no one in this world would ever move forward to become the person they’re meant to be.” -B.K.S. Iyengar Atha Yoganushasanum…
…or in English, Yoga Begins Now
It’s been four sweat-induced weeks since I anxiously walked into the beautiful bamboo structure that is Power of Now Oasis in Sanur, Bali. I’ve got roots here now. Yoga roots! And, I hope to visit again soon. I had the privilege of studying yoga with Jolie Manza, an inspirational, knowledgable, and passionate instructor who I will forever be grateful for. I studied with 13 others from around the globe including my dear Olga from Moscow and Bella from London who have left their mark on me and have given me much love and support. I truly enjoyed the company of the entire group. I am also grateful for my partner in crime, Adrian, who sticks by my side, goes with the flow and is a rock of support for me. He became a regular at the yoga studio and won over the hearts of all the girls. :)
Okay, I’m not going to beat around the bush (literally…just keep reading), the month was physically challenging. I’ve been practicing the physical side of yoga (asana) off and on for years, but was never serious or dedicated to practicing every day until now. I was sore and pushed it a bit too hard, which resulted in a strain in an area where the sun don’t shine. Hello to my very first acupuncture experience. Yep! A total stranger sticking needles in…you guessed it…an area where the sun don’t shine. Ahhhhh! I continued to practice, but backed off of certain postures and let myself heal. Almost there!
Aside from the physical aspect, there were times when I felt like my brain was going to explode, but I loved it and soaked everything in like a thirsty sponge. We focused on the eight limbs of yoga. The physical practice of yoga was the only area I had previously tapped into prior to this course, so I was eager to learn. Basically, the eight limbs are guidelines and practices for moral and ethical conduct. They focus on self-discipline and help us to acknowledge the spiritual aspects of our nature. As a famous yogi, B.K.S. Iyengar, once said, “Without the yamas and niyamas, asana is mere acrobatics.” Yamas and niyamas are the first two limbs and consist of external ethical standards and internal self-discipline.
We read and discussed the Yoga Sutras, which is a heady, philosophical text that’s basically a guide for how to not suck at life. I will practice every day. We worked on pranayama (breath) techniques, practiced calming the monkey mind through meditation. We spent time breaking down each and every posture to learn about proper alignment, risk areas, modifications, variations and the ancient Sanskrit language names. The month was non-stop and it flew by. There were a couple hours here and there reserved for playtime. When you’re at a yoga studio in Bali on the Indian Ocean, playtime consists of a bunch of yogis surfing and sailing on the studio’s 52-foot sailboat. Score!
The last week of the course we had to create a class sequence and teach a class at the studio as well as complete a 3-hour written exam. And, now I’m a certified yoga instructor! I have a solid foundation to start from, but much more to discover. This is just the beginning of a lifetime of learning. I look forward to sharing the practice and seeing what comes of this.
“Change is not something that we should fear. Rather, it is something that we should welcome. For without change, nothing in this world would ever grow or blossom, and no one in this world would ever move forward to become the person they’re meant to be.” -B.K.S. Iyengar

Atha Yoganushasanum…

…or in English, Yoga Begins Now

It’s been four sweat-induced weeks since I anxiously walked into the beautiful bamboo structure that is Power of Now Oasis in Sanur, Bali. I’ve got roots here now. Yoga roots! And, I hope to visit again soon. I had the privilege of studying yoga with Jolie Manza, an inspirational, knowledgable, and passionate instructor who I will forever be grateful for. I studied with 13 others from around the globe including my dear Olga from Moscow and Bella from London who have left their mark on me and have given me much love and support. I truly enjoyed the company of the entire group. I am also grateful for my partner in crime, Adrian, who sticks by my side, goes with the flow and is a rock of support for me. He became a regular at the yoga studio and won over the hearts of all the girls. :)

Okay, I’m not going to beat around the bush (literally…just keep reading), the month was physically challenging. I’ve been practicing the physical side of yoga (asana) off and on for years, but was never serious or dedicated to practicing every day until now. I was sore and pushed it a bit too hard, which resulted in a strain in an area where the sun don’t shine. Hello to my very first acupuncture experience. Yep! A total stranger sticking needles in…you guessed it…an area where the sun don’t shine. Ahhhhh! I continued to practice, but backed off of certain postures and let myself heal. Almost there!

Aside from the physical aspect, there were times when I felt like my brain was going to explode, but I loved it and soaked everything in like a thirsty sponge. We focused on the eight limbs of yoga. The physical practice of yoga was the only area I had previously tapped into prior to this course, so I was eager to learn. Basically, the eight limbs are guidelines and practices for moral and ethical conduct. They focus on self-discipline and help us to acknowledge the spiritual aspects of our nature. As a famous yogi, B.K.S. Iyengar, once said, “Without the yamas and niyamas, asana is mere acrobatics.” Yamas and niyamas are the first two limbs and consist of external ethical standards and internal self-discipline.

We read and discussed the Yoga Sutras, which is a heady, philosophical text that’s basically a guide for how to not suck at life. I will practice every day. We worked on pranayama (breath) techniques, practiced calming the monkey mind through meditation. We spent time breaking down each and every posture to learn about proper alignment, risk areas, modifications, variations and the ancient Sanskrit language names. The month was non-stop and it flew by. There were a couple hours here and there reserved for playtime. When you’re at a yoga studio in Bali on the Indian Ocean, playtime consists of a bunch of yogis surfing and sailing on the studio’s 52-foot sailboat. Score!

The last week of the course we had to create a class sequence and teach a class at the studio as well as complete a 3-hour written exam. And, now I’m a certified yoga instructor! I have a solid foundation to start from, but much more to discover. This is just the beginning of a lifetime of learning. I look forward to sharing the practice and seeing what comes of this.

“Change is not something that we should fear. Rather, it is something that we should welcome. For without change, nothing in this world would ever grow or blossom, and no one in this world would ever move forward to become the person they’re meant to be.” -B.K.S. Iyengar

Nature’s Candy!
Southeast Asia is a fruit lover’s paradise. There are many tropical fruits available here that we know and love in the U.S., such as pinapples, bananas, papaya, mangos, starfruit, limes, coconuts and oranges. But, some new fruit we’ve been introduced to over here have totally rocked our socks off! Literally. We haven’t worn socks in five months.
Jackfruit: Ever tried Juicy Fruit gum? Well, this is the fruity flavor of the gum. These are massive and can weigh up to 60 pounds. Crunchy with large seed in middle. Adrian’s favorite!
Durian: The King of Fruits. Dangerously spiky shell. Creamy on inside. You can smell these from afar and they’re banned from many hotels and public transportation. Smells like sweet garbage. Tastes like sweet onion custard.
Mangosteen: Hard, thick shell. Looks like a garlic clove on inside. So sweet and juicy. Sometimes seeds. My favorite!
Pomelo:  Looks and feels like grapefruit, but sweeter. Another high up on the list for Adrian.
Salak: Shell looks like snakeskin. Hard and crunchy and tastes like grape candy. Large seed on inside.
Dragonfruit: These come in both white and bright pink on inside. Many edible tiny black seeds. Tastes like a water-downed kiwi and similar in texture.
Soursop: Also called sugar apples, although nothing like an apple. Super sweet. Squishy texture. Many seeds need to be removed. Hard to eat, but worth the treat!
Rambutan: Shell looks hard and prickly, but the hairs are actually soft. Looks like a big round pearl on inside. Soft, sweet with big seed in middle.
Lychee: Hard, prickly, thick shell. Very similar to rambutan in terms of texture and flavor.
Longan: Hard, thin shell. Similar to rambutan and lychee on inside. Nature’s Candy!
Southeast Asia is a fruit lover’s paradise. There are many tropical fruits available here that we know and love in the U.S., such as pinapples, bananas, papaya, mangos, starfruit, limes, coconuts and oranges. But, some new fruit we’ve been introduced to over here have totally rocked our socks off! Literally. We haven’t worn socks in five months.
Jackfruit: Ever tried Juicy Fruit gum? Well, this is the fruity flavor of the gum. These are massive and can weigh up to 60 pounds. Crunchy with large seed in middle. Adrian’s favorite!
Durian: The King of Fruits. Dangerously spiky shell. Creamy on inside. You can smell these from afar and they’re banned from many hotels and public transportation. Smells like sweet garbage. Tastes like sweet onion custard.
Mangosteen: Hard, thick shell. Looks like a garlic clove on inside. So sweet and juicy. Sometimes seeds. My favorite!
Pomelo:  Looks and feels like grapefruit, but sweeter. Another high up on the list for Adrian.
Salak: Shell looks like snakeskin. Hard and crunchy and tastes like grape candy. Large seed on inside.
Dragonfruit: These come in both white and bright pink on inside. Many edible tiny black seeds. Tastes like a water-downed kiwi and similar in texture.
Soursop: Also called sugar apples, although nothing like an apple. Super sweet. Squishy texture. Many seeds need to be removed. Hard to eat, but worth the treat!
Rambutan: Shell looks hard and prickly, but the hairs are actually soft. Looks like a big round pearl on inside. Soft, sweet with big seed in middle.
Lychee: Hard, prickly, thick shell. Very similar to rambutan in terms of texture and flavor.
Longan: Hard, thin shell. Similar to rambutan and lychee on inside. Nature’s Candy!
Southeast Asia is a fruit lover’s paradise. There are many tropical fruits available here that we know and love in the U.S., such as pinapples, bananas, papaya, mangos, starfruit, limes, coconuts and oranges. But, some new fruit we’ve been introduced to over here have totally rocked our socks off! Literally. We haven’t worn socks in five months.
Jackfruit: Ever tried Juicy Fruit gum? Well, this is the fruity flavor of the gum. These are massive and can weigh up to 60 pounds. Crunchy with large seed in middle. Adrian’s favorite!
Durian: The King of Fruits. Dangerously spiky shell. Creamy on inside. You can smell these from afar and they’re banned from many hotels and public transportation. Smells like sweet garbage. Tastes like sweet onion custard.
Mangosteen: Hard, thick shell. Looks like a garlic clove on inside. So sweet and juicy. Sometimes seeds. My favorite!
Pomelo:  Looks and feels like grapefruit, but sweeter. Another high up on the list for Adrian.
Salak: Shell looks like snakeskin. Hard and crunchy and tastes like grape candy. Large seed on inside.
Dragonfruit: These come in both white and bright pink on inside. Many edible tiny black seeds. Tastes like a water-downed kiwi and similar in texture.
Soursop: Also called sugar apples, although nothing like an apple. Super sweet. Squishy texture. Many seeds need to be removed. Hard to eat, but worth the treat!
Rambutan: Shell looks hard and prickly, but the hairs are actually soft. Looks like a big round pearl on inside. Soft, sweet with big seed in middle.
Lychee: Hard, prickly, thick shell. Very similar to rambutan in terms of texture and flavor.
Longan: Hard, thin shell. Similar to rambutan and lychee on inside. Nature’s Candy!
Southeast Asia is a fruit lover’s paradise. There are many tropical fruits available here that we know and love in the U.S., such as pinapples, bananas, papaya, mangos, starfruit, limes, coconuts and oranges. But, some new fruit we’ve been introduced to over here have totally rocked our socks off! Literally. We haven’t worn socks in five months.
Jackfruit: Ever tried Juicy Fruit gum? Well, this is the fruity flavor of the gum. These are massive and can weigh up to 60 pounds. Crunchy with large seed in middle. Adrian’s favorite!
Durian: The King of Fruits. Dangerously spiky shell. Creamy on inside. You can smell these from afar and they’re banned from many hotels and public transportation. Smells like sweet garbage. Tastes like sweet onion custard.
Mangosteen: Hard, thick shell. Looks like a garlic clove on inside. So sweet and juicy. Sometimes seeds. My favorite!
Pomelo:  Looks and feels like grapefruit, but sweeter. Another high up on the list for Adrian.
Salak: Shell looks like snakeskin. Hard and crunchy and tastes like grape candy. Large seed on inside.
Dragonfruit: These come in both white and bright pink on inside. Many edible tiny black seeds. Tastes like a water-downed kiwi and similar in texture.
Soursop: Also called sugar apples, although nothing like an apple. Super sweet. Squishy texture. Many seeds need to be removed. Hard to eat, but worth the treat!
Rambutan: Shell looks hard and prickly, but the hairs are actually soft. Looks like a big round pearl on inside. Soft, sweet with big seed in middle.
Lychee: Hard, prickly, thick shell. Very similar to rambutan in terms of texture and flavor.
Longan: Hard, thin shell. Similar to rambutan and lychee on inside. Nature’s Candy!
Southeast Asia is a fruit lover’s paradise. There are many tropical fruits available here that we know and love in the U.S., such as pinapples, bananas, papaya, mangos, starfruit, limes, coconuts and oranges. But, some new fruit we’ve been introduced to over here have totally rocked our socks off! Literally. We haven’t worn socks in five months.
Jackfruit: Ever tried Juicy Fruit gum? Well, this is the fruity flavor of the gum. These are massive and can weigh up to 60 pounds. Crunchy with large seed in middle. Adrian’s favorite!
Durian: The King of Fruits. Dangerously spiky shell. Creamy on inside. You can smell these from afar and they’re banned from many hotels and public transportation. Smells like sweet garbage. Tastes like sweet onion custard.
Mangosteen: Hard, thick shell. Looks like a garlic clove on inside. So sweet and juicy. Sometimes seeds. My favorite!
Pomelo:  Looks and feels like grapefruit, but sweeter. Another high up on the list for Adrian.
Salak: Shell looks like snakeskin. Hard and crunchy and tastes like grape candy. Large seed on inside.
Dragonfruit: These come in both white and bright pink on inside. Many edible tiny black seeds. Tastes like a water-downed kiwi and similar in texture.
Soursop: Also called sugar apples, although nothing like an apple. Super sweet. Squishy texture. Many seeds need to be removed. Hard to eat, but worth the treat!
Rambutan: Shell looks hard and prickly, but the hairs are actually soft. Looks like a big round pearl on inside. Soft, sweet with big seed in middle.
Lychee: Hard, prickly, thick shell. Very similar to rambutan in terms of texture and flavor.
Longan: Hard, thin shell. Similar to rambutan and lychee on inside. Nature’s Candy!
Southeast Asia is a fruit lover’s paradise. There are many tropical fruits available here that we know and love in the U.S., such as pinapples, bananas, papaya, mangos, starfruit, limes, coconuts and oranges. But, some new fruit we’ve been introduced to over here have totally rocked our socks off! Literally. We haven’t worn socks in five months.
Jackfruit: Ever tried Juicy Fruit gum? Well, this is the fruity flavor of the gum. These are massive and can weigh up to 60 pounds. Crunchy with large seed in middle. Adrian’s favorite!
Durian: The King of Fruits. Dangerously spiky shell. Creamy on inside. You can smell these from afar and they’re banned from many hotels and public transportation. Smells like sweet garbage. Tastes like sweet onion custard.
Mangosteen: Hard, thick shell. Looks like a garlic clove on inside. So sweet and juicy. Sometimes seeds. My favorite!
Pomelo:  Looks and feels like grapefruit, but sweeter. Another high up on the list for Adrian.
Salak: Shell looks like snakeskin. Hard and crunchy and tastes like grape candy. Large seed on inside.
Dragonfruit: These come in both white and bright pink on inside. Many edible tiny black seeds. Tastes like a water-downed kiwi and similar in texture.
Soursop: Also called sugar apples, although nothing like an apple. Super sweet. Squishy texture. Many seeds need to be removed. Hard to eat, but worth the treat!
Rambutan: Shell looks hard and prickly, but the hairs are actually soft. Looks like a big round pearl on inside. Soft, sweet with big seed in middle.
Lychee: Hard, prickly, thick shell. Very similar to rambutan in terms of texture and flavor.
Longan: Hard, thin shell. Similar to rambutan and lychee on inside. Nature’s Candy!
Southeast Asia is a fruit lover’s paradise. There are many tropical fruits available here that we know and love in the U.S., such as pinapples, bananas, papaya, mangos, starfruit, limes, coconuts and oranges. But, some new fruit we’ve been introduced to over here have totally rocked our socks off! Literally. We haven’t worn socks in five months.
Jackfruit: Ever tried Juicy Fruit gum? Well, this is the fruity flavor of the gum. These are massive and can weigh up to 60 pounds. Crunchy with large seed in middle. Adrian’s favorite!
Durian: The King of Fruits. Dangerously spiky shell. Creamy on inside. You can smell these from afar and they’re banned from many hotels and public transportation. Smells like sweet garbage. Tastes like sweet onion custard.
Mangosteen: Hard, thick shell. Looks like a garlic clove on inside. So sweet and juicy. Sometimes seeds. My favorite!
Pomelo:  Looks and feels like grapefruit, but sweeter. Another high up on the list for Adrian.
Salak: Shell looks like snakeskin. Hard and crunchy and tastes like grape candy. Large seed on inside.
Dragonfruit: These come in both white and bright pink on inside. Many edible tiny black seeds. Tastes like a water-downed kiwi and similar in texture.
Soursop: Also called sugar apples, although nothing like an apple. Super sweet. Squishy texture. Many seeds need to be removed. Hard to eat, but worth the treat!
Rambutan: Shell looks hard and prickly, but the hairs are actually soft. Looks like a big round pearl on inside. Soft, sweet with big seed in middle.
Lychee: Hard, prickly, thick shell. Very similar to rambutan in terms of texture and flavor.
Longan: Hard, thin shell. Similar to rambutan and lychee on inside. Nature’s Candy!
Southeast Asia is a fruit lover’s paradise. There are many tropical fruits available here that we know and love in the U.S., such as pinapples, bananas, papaya, mangos, starfruit, limes, coconuts and oranges. But, some new fruit we’ve been introduced to over here have totally rocked our socks off! Literally. We haven’t worn socks in five months.
Jackfruit: Ever tried Juicy Fruit gum? Well, this is the fruity flavor of the gum. These are massive and can weigh up to 60 pounds. Crunchy with large seed in middle. Adrian’s favorite!
Durian: The King of Fruits. Dangerously spiky shell. Creamy on inside. You can smell these from afar and they’re banned from many hotels and public transportation. Smells like sweet garbage. Tastes like sweet onion custard.
Mangosteen: Hard, thick shell. Looks like a garlic clove on inside. So sweet and juicy. Sometimes seeds. My favorite!
Pomelo:  Looks and feels like grapefruit, but sweeter. Another high up on the list for Adrian.
Salak: Shell looks like snakeskin. Hard and crunchy and tastes like grape candy. Large seed on inside.
Dragonfruit: These come in both white and bright pink on inside. Many edible tiny black seeds. Tastes like a water-downed kiwi and similar in texture.
Soursop: Also called sugar apples, although nothing like an apple. Super sweet. Squishy texture. Many seeds need to be removed. Hard to eat, but worth the treat!
Rambutan: Shell looks hard and prickly, but the hairs are actually soft. Looks like a big round pearl on inside. Soft, sweet with big seed in middle.
Lychee: Hard, prickly, thick shell. Very similar to rambutan in terms of texture and flavor.
Longan: Hard, thin shell. Similar to rambutan and lychee on inside. Nature’s Candy!
Southeast Asia is a fruit lover’s paradise. There are many tropical fruits available here that we know and love in the U.S., such as pinapples, bananas, papaya, mangos, starfruit, limes, coconuts and oranges. But, some new fruit we’ve been introduced to over here have totally rocked our socks off! Literally. We haven’t worn socks in five months.
Jackfruit: Ever tried Juicy Fruit gum? Well, this is the fruity flavor of the gum. These are massive and can weigh up to 60 pounds. Crunchy with large seed in middle. Adrian’s favorite!
Durian: The King of Fruits. Dangerously spiky shell. Creamy on inside. You can smell these from afar and they’re banned from many hotels and public transportation. Smells like sweet garbage. Tastes like sweet onion custard.
Mangosteen: Hard, thick shell. Looks like a garlic clove on inside. So sweet and juicy. Sometimes seeds. My favorite!
Pomelo:  Looks and feels like grapefruit, but sweeter. Another high up on the list for Adrian.
Salak: Shell looks like snakeskin. Hard and crunchy and tastes like grape candy. Large seed on inside.
Dragonfruit: These come in both white and bright pink on inside. Many edible tiny black seeds. Tastes like a water-downed kiwi and similar in texture.
Soursop: Also called sugar apples, although nothing like an apple. Super sweet. Squishy texture. Many seeds need to be removed. Hard to eat, but worth the treat!
Rambutan: Shell looks hard and prickly, but the hairs are actually soft. Looks like a big round pearl on inside. Soft, sweet with big seed in middle.
Lychee: Hard, prickly, thick shell. Very similar to rambutan in terms of texture and flavor.
Longan: Hard, thin shell. Similar to rambutan and lychee on inside. Nature’s Candy!
Southeast Asia is a fruit lover’s paradise. There are many tropical fruits available here that we know and love in the U.S., such as pinapples, bananas, papaya, mangos, starfruit, limes, coconuts and oranges. But, some new fruit we’ve been introduced to over here have totally rocked our socks off! Literally. We haven’t worn socks in five months.
Jackfruit: Ever tried Juicy Fruit gum? Well, this is the fruity flavor of the gum. These are massive and can weigh up to 60 pounds. Crunchy with large seed in middle. Adrian’s favorite!
Durian: The King of Fruits. Dangerously spiky shell. Creamy on inside. You can smell these from afar and they’re banned from many hotels and public transportation. Smells like sweet garbage. Tastes like sweet onion custard.
Mangosteen: Hard, thick shell. Looks like a garlic clove on inside. So sweet and juicy. Sometimes seeds. My favorite!
Pomelo:  Looks and feels like grapefruit, but sweeter. Another high up on the list for Adrian.
Salak: Shell looks like snakeskin. Hard and crunchy and tastes like grape candy. Large seed on inside.
Dragonfruit: These come in both white and bright pink on inside. Many edible tiny black seeds. Tastes like a water-downed kiwi and similar in texture.
Soursop: Also called sugar apples, although nothing like an apple. Super sweet. Squishy texture. Many seeds need to be removed. Hard to eat, but worth the treat!
Rambutan: Shell looks hard and prickly, but the hairs are actually soft. Looks like a big round pearl on inside. Soft, sweet with big seed in middle.
Lychee: Hard, prickly, thick shell. Very similar to rambutan in terms of texture and flavor.
Longan: Hard, thin shell. Similar to rambutan and lychee on inside.

Nature’s Candy!

Southeast Asia is a fruit lover’s paradise. There are many tropical fruits available here that we know and love in the U.S., such as pinapples, bananas, papaya, mangos, starfruit, limes, coconuts and oranges. But, some new fruit we’ve been introduced to over here have totally rocked our socks off! Literally. We haven’t worn socks in five months.

Jackfruit:
Ever tried Juicy Fruit gum? Well, this is the fruity flavor of the gum. These are massive and can weigh up to 60 pounds. Crunchy with large seed in middle. Adrian’s favorite!

Durian:
The King of Fruits. Dangerously spiky shell. Creamy on inside. You can smell these from afar and they’re banned from many hotels and public transportation. Smells like sweet garbage. Tastes like sweet onion custard.

Mangosteen:
Hard, thick shell. Looks like a garlic clove on inside. So sweet and juicy. Sometimes seeds. My favorite!

Pomelo:
Looks and feels like grapefruit, but sweeter. Another high up on the list for Adrian.

Salak:
Shell looks like snakeskin. Hard and crunchy and tastes like grape candy. Large seed on inside.

Dragonfruit:
These come in both white and bright pink on inside. Many edible tiny black seeds. Tastes like a water-downed kiwi and similar in texture.

Soursop:
Also called sugar apples, although nothing like an apple. Super sweet. Squishy texture. Many seeds need to be removed. Hard to eat, but worth the treat!

Rambutan:
Shell looks hard and prickly, but the hairs are actually soft. Looks like a big round pearl on inside. Soft, sweet with big seed in middle.

Lychee:
Hard, prickly, thick shell. Very similar to rambutan in terms of texture and flavor.

Longan:
Hard, thin shell. Similar to rambutan and lychee on inside.

Girl swimming in her clothes? Or, mermaid rising up from the depths of the sea? #Bali #swimsuitsareoverrated #mermaid